gram-, -gram-, -gram, -grammatic, -grammatical, -grammatically, -gramme, -grammic +

(Greek: write, writing, something written, a written record, a recording; letters; words; later, a small weight, a unit of mass in the metric system)

A unit of weight in the metric system from 1797 gramme, borrowing of French gramme, from Late Latin gramma, "small weight"; from Greek gramma, "small weight"; originally, "something written"; from the stem of graphein, "to draw, to write".

—Compiled from information located in;
The Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology; Robert K. Barnhart, Editor;
The H.W. Wilson Company; New York; 1988; page 445.
ergocardiogram
A record of the extent of movement or the amount of work done by the heart.
ergogram
A record made by an ergograph (an instrument for recording the amount of work done by muscular contractions, or the amplitude of contraction).
esophagogram
1. A roentgenogram of the esophagus obtained during esophagraphy.
2. A radiographic record of contrast esophagography or a barium swallow.
ethogram
1. A pictorial catalog of the behavioral patterns of an organism or a species.
2. A pictorial inventory of the repertoire of behavior patterns shown by the members of a species.
exagram (Eg)
A unit of mass equal to 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 grams.
factory programming
1. Some "read-only" must have their identification number written into the silicon microchip at the time the chip is made.

The process of writing the number into the chip is called "factory programming". This data can't be written over or changed.

2. The programming of information into a tag occurring as part of the manufacturing process.

The tag is "read-only".

fathogram
A tracing, made by an echo-sounder, representing the varying depth of water beneath a moving vessel.
femtogram, fg
A unit of mass equal to 0.000 000 000 000 001 grams or 10-15 grams. Symbol: fg
field programming
1. Tags that use EEPROM, or non-volatile memory, can be programmed after it is shipped from the factory. That is, users can write data to the tag when it is placed on a product.
2. The programming of information into a tag after it has been shipped from the manufacturer, usually meaning that information specific to the application can be added by the using organization. The tag is "read only".
glottogram
The oscilloscopic record of vocal cord activity made with electrolaryngography.
grammalogue
Shorthand; a word represented by a single sign; also, a letter or character representing a word (more correctly called a logogram). Examples of grammalogues include: &, #, ©, ®, ¶, and @.

Although & is called an ampersand (meaning "and"), there is also a new symbol which is called a questpersand which is pronounced: "and?"

questpersand symbol
—Source: Verbatim, The Language Quarterly, Essex, Connecticut, 1977, page 536.
grammar
1. The study of a language that deals with its inflexional forms or other means of indicating the relations of words in the sentence, and with the rules for employing these in accordance with established usage; usually including also the department that deals with the phonetic system of the language and the principles of its representation in writing.
2. An individual's manner of using grammatical forms; speech or writing judged as good or bad according to its conformity to or violations of the grammatical rules of a language; also speech or writing that is correct according to those rules.
3. The phenomena that form the subject-matter of grammar; the system of inflexions and syntactical usages characteristic of a language.
4. The study of a language that deals with its inflexional forms or other means of indicating the relations of words in a sentence, and with the rules for employing these in accordance with established usage; usually also including the department that deals with the phonetic system of the language and the principles of its representation in writing.
5. An individual’s manner of using grammatical forms; speech or writing judged as good or bad according to its conformity to or violations of the grammatical rules of a language; also speech or writing that is "correct" according to those rules.
6. The phenomena that form the subject-matter of grammar; the system of inflexions and syntactical usages characteristic of a language.

Writing is the only profession where no one considers you ridiculous if you earn no money.

—Jules Renard
grammarian
1. Someone who is versed in the knowledge of grammar, or of language generally; a philologist; often signifying also a writer about, or a teacher of grammar who teaches the rules setting forth the current standard of usage for teaching or reference purposes..
2. Someone who is very skilled in grammar or a linguist who specializes in the study of grammar and syntax; such as, a set of rules that describe the structure of a language and control the way that sentences are formed.
3. A writer on grammar, especially someone who espouses (gives one's loyalty or support to) or advocates prescriptive rules.
grammarianism
An excessive emphasis upon the fine points of grammar and usage; especially, a dedication to the doctrine of grammatical correctness; grammatism.
grammatical
1. Referring to or relating to grammar or the system of rules by which words are formed and put together to make sentences.
2. Conforming to the rules of grammar or verbal usage which is accepted by native speakers: "She was asked to write a grammatical sentence about her travels."
3. A description of the structure of a language, consisting of the sounds (phonology); the meaningful combinations of these sounds into words or parts of words, (morphemes); and the arrangement of the morphemes into phrases and sentences (syntax).

Related "writing" word units: glypto-; graph-; scrib-, script-.