-ability

(Latin: suffix; expressing ability, capacity, fitness, or "that which may be easily handled or managed")

Just a few examples out of hundreds of words presented as the noun forms of -able; forming nouns of quality from, or corresponding to, adjectives in -able; the quality in an agent that makes an action possible. The suffix -ible has related meanings.

probability
A measure of how likely it is that some event will occur.
Quotes: Ability, Part 1
Use it, don't waste it: ability quotes.
Quotes: Ability, Part 2
Discover it, utilize it: ability quotes.
realizability
1. In control systems. the property of a transfer function that can be realized by a network that has only resistances, capacitances, inductances, and ideal transformers.
2. In computer science, a modified realizability justifies the process of program extraction implemented in some proof assistants.
recognizability (s) (noun), recognizabilities (pl)
The quality of being easily aware of something or being known: When learning German for the first time, easy words are taught and used over and over again, producing easy recognizability for the beginners who are learning he language.
reconcilability
refutability (s) (noun), refutabilities (pl)
Anything which can be overthrown, disproved by evidence of falseness, or countervailing proof; such as, an argument, an opinion, a testimony, a doctrine, or a theory: Although most people think of swans as being just large white birds, the refutability of that perception is clear because there are also black swans.
reliability
1. The trait of being dependable or reliable.
2. The tendency of a system to be resistant to failure.
repairability
reprogrammability
The ability to read from and to write data to the tag while that same tag is attached to its object.
respectability
Honorableness by virtue of being respectable and having a good reputation; worthy of respect.
revealability
security vulnerability (s) (noun), security vulnerabilities (pl)
In computer protection, the term security vulnerability is applied to a weakness in a system which allows an attacker to violate the integrity of that system.

Security vulnerabilities may result from weak passwords, software bugs, a computer virus, or other malware, or a script code injection.

A security vulnerability is classified as an serious problelm if it is recognized as a possible means of attack.

—Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms; US Department of Defense.
sociability
1. The distribution of individuals of a species within a natural community relative to others of the species.
2. A ranking index which ranges from isolation to aggregation.
3. The characteristic in adult humans to seek the company of other people and to engage in amicable exchange with them, or the disposition in human infants and in infrahumans to react to others of their species, an integral part of temperament (one's usual mood).
4. The act or an instance of being sociable.
5. The quality, state, disposition, or inclination of being sociable.
social vulnerability (s) (noun), social vulnerabilities (pl)
One dimension of multiple stressors and shocks, including natural hazards: These social vulnerabilities refer to the inability of people, organizations, and societies to withstand adverse impacts from multiple stressors to which they are exposed.

These impacts of social vulnerabilities are caused in part by characteristics inherent in social interactions, institutions, and systems of cultural values.