-emia, -aemia +

(Greek: a suffix; blood, usually a diseased condition of the blood)

cupremia
The presence of copper in the blood.
drepanocytemia
Sickle cell anemia.
dysemia, dysaemia
1. Any abnormal condition or disease of the blood.
2. A morbid or vitiated condition of the blood; especially, when resulting from mineral poisoning.
erytheremia
A chronic form of polycythemia (abnormal proliferation of all hematopoietic bone marrow elements and an absolute increase in red cell mass and total blood volume) of unknown cause, characterized by an increase in blood volume and red blood cells, bone marrow hyperplasia, redness or cyanosis of the skin, and enlargement of the spleen.
glucohemia
A medical term meaning that blood contains the sugar glucose; glycaemia.
hydremia, hydraemia
1. A blood disorder in which there is excess fluid volume (of water) compared with the cell volume of the blood.
2. The excessive dilution of the blood, so that the proportion of serum to corpuscles is excessive.
3. A condition in which the blood volume is increased as a result of an increase in the water content of plasma, with or without a reduction in the concentration of protein; there is an excess of plasma in proportion to the cellular elements and a corresponding decrease in hematocrit (proportion of the blood that consists of packed red blood cells).
4. Excessive dilution of the blood, so that the proportion of serum to corpuscles is excessive; seen in splenomegaly (enlargement of the spleen) and other conditions.

A condition in which the blood volume is increased as a result of an increase in the water content of plasma, with or without a reduction in the concentration of protein; there is an excess of plasma in proportion to the cellular elements and a corresponding decrease in hematocrit (percentage of the volume of a blood sample occupied by cells).

hyperbilirubinemia
An abnormally high level of bilirubin in the blood, manifested by jaundice, anorexia, and malaise, occurring in association with liver disease and certain hemolytic anemias.

A sufficient elevation will produce jaundice. Some degree of hyperbilirubinemia is very common in babies right after birth, especially premies.

hyperemia, hyperaemia
1. An unusually high level of blood in some part of the body.
2. An excess of blood in a part of the boy or an engorgement (overfullness or obstruction of the vessels in some part of the system).
hyperglycemia, hyperglycaemia
1. An abnormally high blood sugar level in the body which is usually associated with diabetes.
2. An elevated level specifically of the sugar glucose in the blood.

Hyperglycemia is often found in diabetes mellitus. It occurs when the body does not have enough insulin or cannot use the insulin it has to turn glucose into energy.

hyperlipemia
An excessive level of lipids, or fats, in the blood.
hyperlipoproteinemia
1. Any of various disorders of lipoprotein metabolism, usually characterized by abnormally high levels of cholesterol and certain lipoproteins in the blood.
2. An excess of lipoproteins (any of the lipid-protein, or fat-protein, complexes in which lipids or fats exist) in the blood, due to a disorder of lipoprotein metabolism.

It may be acquired or hereditary. Acquired forms accompany other disorders or may be caused by environmental factors such as diet.

There are a number of different hereditary forms, classified according to clinical features, enzymatic abnormalities, and serum lipoprotein patterns.

hyperoxemia
An excessive acidity of the blood.
hypogammaglobulinemia
1. An immunodeficiency condition arising from a deficiency of gamma globulin in the blood, either present from birth or acquired later during life.
2. Abnormally low levels of all classes of immunoglobulins in the blood.
hypoglycemia, hypoglycaemia
1. An abnormally low blood sugar usually resulting from excessive insulin or a poor diet.
2. An abnormally low level of glucose in the blood.

The symptoms of hypoglycemia may include anxiety, sweating, tremor, palpitations, nausea, and pallor.

Hypoglycemia also starves the brain of glucose energy, which is essential for proper brain function. Lack of glucose energy to the brain can cause symptoms ranging from headache, mild confusion, and abnormal behavior, to the loss of consciousness, seizure, and coma. Severe hypoglycemia can cause death.

hypovolemia
1. An abnormal decrease in blood volume or, strictly speaking, an abnormal decrease in the volume of blood plasma.
2. An abnormally decreased volume of circulating blood in the body; the most common cause is hemorrhage or bleeding.

Inter-related cross references, directly or indirectly, involving "blood" word units: angi-; apheresis; hemo-; hemoglobin-; phleb-; sangui-; vas-; vascul-.