com-, co-, cog-, col-, con-, cor-

(Latin: together, together with, with)

The prefix com- is assimilated to co- before h, w, and all vowels:

The prefix com- becomes, cog- before g: cognition, [co + gnoscere, "to know"], et al.

The prefix com- becomes, col- before l: colloquial, et al.

The prefix com- becomes, con- before c, d, g, j, n, q, s, t, v: covivant, et al.

The prefix com- becomes, cor- before r: corrigible, et al.

The words for this unit show cartoons for all of the examples of the com-, co-, cog-, col-, con-, cor- entries; however, there are many more of them which exist in other units which are available when you type in a particular word in the search box at the bottom of this page.

contusion (kuhn TOO zhuhn) (s) (noun), contusions (pl)
A bruise or a part of damaged tissue in which blood capillaries have been ruptured: A contusion is an injury to the body in which the skin is not broken; however, there is usually a discolored area that could have been caused by a blow or impact that burst the underlying vessels of a person’s vital body fluid.
A bruise that affects the tissue under the skin, but not breaking the skin.
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convene (verb), convenes; convened; convening
1. To come or to meet together; especially, for a common purpose: The students convened in the auditorium to listen to a graduate of the school who is now an ambassador to France.
2. To assemble for united actions; to meet in a convention: The mayor of the city convened with some of the citizens in an effort to resolve a few issues regarding an increase in local taxes.
3. To associate with others in harmony with each other: A panel of employees was convened by the president of the company to review their profits and losses.
To come together for a public reason.
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conventional (adjective), more conventional, most conventional
Relating to something which is in accordance with what is generally done as established by social customs: While microwaves heat up food more quickly, most meals seem to taste better when they are cooked on a conventional stove.
Pertaining to the usual or traditional way of doing something.
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convey (verb), conveys; conveyed; conveying
1. To take or to move someone or something to a destination or a place: The truck was able to convey all of the furniture and other property of Mike's family from their former residence to their new living quarters.
2. To make something known to others: Mark’s behavior always shows his desire to convey all the tenderness and love which he felt for his little girl.
3. To transfer or to transmit something along a wire, a pipe, a tube, or some other carrier: Margaret used her computer to convey her messages by e-mail.
To communicate or to make known in a definite way.
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conviction (s) (noun), convictions (pl)
1. A belief or an opinion that is held strongly: Jane’s mother had a conviction that girls and women should always wear dresses or skirts, but not trousers, jeans, or slacks.
2. A firmness of an opinion; such as, something that is said with complete certainty or confidence: Mrs. Smith had a strong conviction that all of the people around the world should have the freedom of speech.
3. An act of finding someone guilty of a crime: The evidence pointed out that a conviction was certain because of Tim's drunk-driving when he was going home after being at the pub.
4. The act or process of persuading or the state of being convinced: The teachers of the school all shared a strong conviction that the principal should call a meeting to discuss and to solve the problems of so many refugees coming to their school all of a sudden.
A strong belief or persuasion.
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convoy (verb), convoys; convoyed; convoying
1. To travel with and to protect someone or something: The police and FBI agents have the duty to convoy the President to the White House.
2. Etymology: from Medieval Latin conviare, "to escort, to guard, to protect"; from Latin com-, "with, together" + via, "way".
To escort or to be with someone or something for protection by sea or land.
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corporal (adjective), more corporal, most corporal
A reference to the physical body: The use of corporal punishment is just one example of the use of the term.

Tom's school banned the use of corporal punishment several years ago.

There are many people who strive to develop better corporal conditions for themselves by eating more nourishing meals and exercising as much as possible.

A reference to the human body.
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corpulency (s) (noun), corpulencies (pl)
An abnormal accumulation of body fat, usually 20% or more over an individual's ideal body weight which is associated with an increased risk of illness, disability, and death: Corpulency has become a serious problem in many countries because there are more and more people who are dangerously overweight.

Although the following cartoons are adjectives, they illustrate this noun entry.

Being excessively overweight.
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Being extremely overweight.
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corpulent (adjective), more corpulent, most corpulent
1. Descriptive of someone who is very overweight and so it refers to someone who has a very large and plump body: A corpulent person usually has an obesity that can be dangerous to his or her well-being.

As a very corpulent person, Effie was just too heavy for the motorboat that her husband was trying to navigate on the lake.

2. A formal word that describes an overweight person: If anyone is trying to be respectful when describing a fat man, he or she might refer to him as a corpulent gentleman.
A woman who is significantly over weight is too much for the small boat.
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A man who is significantly over weight is too much for a small boat.
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corrigendum (s) (noun), corrigenda (pl)
1. An error that needs to be corrected; especially, one in a completed publication: After Kelly's book was almost on the market a corrigendum was detected by the publishers.
2. A list of mistakes that need to be corrected and inserted into a book after it has been printed: The corrigenda, indicating several amended or corrected passages, were placed in a special listing in the back of each copy of Jacob's novel before it went on sale in the bookstores.
A printing error that needs to be corrected.
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corrigible (adjective), more corrigible, most corrigible
1. Capable of being corrected, improved, reformed, or set properly: The short story that the teacher assigned the students to read was in a corrigible form in that it was easy to understand and it helped them to increase their vocabulary skills.
2. That which is susceptible to being reformed or corrected: Jane was still a very young girl making mistakes like little children do, but she was willing to do better and so she was quite the corrigible child.
3. Etymology: from corrigere "to make straight, to correct", from com, "together" + regere, "to make straight, to lead, to guide, to conduct".
A reference to being capable of doing the right thing.
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corroborate (verb), corroborates; corroborated; corroborating
1. To give or to present evidence of the truth of something: What Jack saw from the street corner corroborated exactly with how the car accident happened.
2. To provide a legal or a formal confirmation to something; such as, a law, a legal act, etc.: The written statement provided by the tenants in court did not corroborate with the owner’s presumption that they were responsible for the leak in the roof.
3. To strengthen an opinion, a statement, or an argument, etc. with additional information that supports what has been presented before: Fortunately Ed’s father was able to corroborate the fact that his son didn't kick the ball through the neighbor's window.
To validate or to confirm a statement or action.
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To make more certain.
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To give additional proof about an accusation.
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coruscation (s) (noun), coruscations (pl)
1. A sudden or striking display of luminosity: From her living room window, Sally could see the coruscation of the fireworks which were taking place in the football field in town.
2. An instance of a spark or a small ray of fire: After trying for so long to get their campfire started, Tom and Jerry suddenly saw a flicker of light or coruscation appearing among the sticks on the ground.
3. A subjective sensation of flashing lights or glittering in front of the eyes: After the car accident, Jill seemed to be affected with coruscation because she could only see glowing or scintillating lights when she looked around.
4. A striking display of brilliance or wit: Jack's coruscation was certainly impressive when he was able to say exactly who composed which piece of music just by listening to a few measures of any harmonic composition!
A presentation of a sudden display of knowledge or wit.
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incoherent (in" koh HIR uhnt) (adjective), more incoherent, most incoherent
1. Descriptive of an object that is without physical cohesion; relating to parts which do not stick or cling together; unconnected, disjoined, loose: Thomas tried to glue the broken pieces of the vase together, but they turned out to be very incoherent because they wouldn't adhere to each other and so the pieces fell apart.
2. Relating to the formation of a group or series of incongruous parts; not connected or unified by any general principle or characteristic; inconsistent, uncoordinated: The package containing the sections of the cupboard seemed to be rather incoherent because none of the pieces fit together like the directions indicated.
3. A reference to thought and mental phenomena, language, literary compositions, etc.; in which there is no logical connexion or natural sequence of ideas: The essay was Natalie's first one and it turned out to be somewhat incoherent, but Mr. Smart helped her in getting her conceptions in a well-organized and understandable order.
4. Regarding someone’s thoughts which are not expressed in a clear or orderly manner: Because of his accident, Mr. Foster’s speech was very incoherent and he could not be understood when he tried to talk to other people.
Conveying a disconnected condition by being unable to think or to express one's thoughts clearly or in an orderly manner.
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precognition (pree" kahg NISH uhn) (s) (noun), precognitions (pl)
1. Of the nature of, or giving, foreknowledge: In her dream, Rebecca had a precognition that her brother was going to visit her the next day, and sure enough, he did!
2. The extrasensory perception of a future event: It is said that some twins have a feeling of precognition for each other, knowing what the other one needs, or wishes for, or when he or she is in trouble.
Supposedly a perception of something happening before it occurs.
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Related "together" units: greg-; inter-; struct-.

There are additional units that include com-, co-, cog-, col-, con-, cor- entries which you can find by typing the word you are looking for when you open the Search Box below.