com-, co-, cog-, col-, con-, cor-

(Latin: together, together with, with)

The prefix com- is assimilated to co- before h, w, and all vowels:

The prefix com- becomes, cog- before g: cognition, [co + gnoscere, "to know"], et al.

The prefix com- becomes, col- before l: colloquial, et al.

The prefix com- becomes, con- before c, d, g, j, n, q, s, t, v: covivant, et al.

The prefix com- becomes, cor- before r: corrigible, et al.

The words for this unit show cartoons for all of the examples of the com-, co-, cog-, col-, con-, cor- entries; however, there are many more of them which exist in other units which are available when you type in a particular word in the search box at the bottom of this page.

complicate (KAHM pli kayte") (verb), complicates; complicated; complicating
1. To make something more difficult or less simple to do: Mark woke up late, and to complicate matters further, his train did not arrive on schedule and so he couldn't get to work on time.
2. To cause a situation to become more dangerous or harder to treat: The doctor warned Carol that her illness would be complicated by the infection that had just developed.
To make things difficult or hard to achieve.
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complicity (s) (noun), complicities (pl)
1. Participation in wrongdoing, or involvement, with someone else in doing something illegal: The authorities found out that the computer programmer was taking part in a complicity to get private information about people's credit cards for a criminal organization so it could transfer money from the bank accounts of the victims.
2. The act of helping to commit a questionable act, an illegal activity, or a crime: Jerome was involved with his brother in a complicity to steal diamonds and valuable necklaces and rings from the jewelry store.
Partnership in a criminal act.
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complimentary (adjective), more complimentary, most complimentary
1. Referring to something that is said which expresses admiration or praise: Thomas made the most complimentary remarks about Shirley's dress than anyone else at the dance, saying that it was very pleasing for her figure.
2. Concerning something which is given for free: At the bookstore, some complimentary books were given away to the author’s fans with his autograph written on the inside.
A reference to giving something free out of good will or courtesy.
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comply (verb), complies; complied; complying
To conform by acting in accordance with a request or an order: Susan asked the bank clerk to help her fill out the form and he gladly complied with her desire. 

Lynn strived to comply with the German grammar rules hoping that her teacher wouldn't have to use her red pen too much to point out mistakes on the homework she turned in!

To respond in accordance with a request or an order.
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component (s) (noun), components (pl)
1. A separate part of a whole, usually of something bigger: Mike worked for a company that manufactured automobile components.

Fresh fruits and vegetables are considered to be essential components of a healthy diet.

A component is what is "put together with" other parts in order to make a whole structure.

The university course has four main components: business law, finance, computing, and management skills.

2. A smaller, self-contained part of a larger entity, which often refers to a manufactured object that is part of a larger device: This box contains the necessary components to complete the model doll house.
3. A device, such as a resistor or transistor, that is part of an electronic circuit: The electrician has to replace one of the electrical components in the house wiring before the residents can turn on their lights, TV sets, refrigerators, etc. again.
4. In chemistry, one of the substances necessary to describe each phase of a chemical system: For their chemistry examination, Timothy and the other students were asked to determine the components of a substance in the various test tubes.
5. Etymology: from Latin componentem, "putting together"; from com, "together" + ponere, "to put".
A part of something that is being compiled or constructed.
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comportment (s) (noun), comportments (pl)
Personal behavior, public conduct, or course of action: The positive comportment of the politician encouraged many people to vote for him.

The good comportments of the students made it easier for the teacher to teach and for the students to learn more.

Public behavior or actions.
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composite (adjective), more composite, most composite
Pertaining to something that is made up of different parts or elements: The witnesses gave the police artist a variety of composite descriptions which made it difficult to identify the man the police were looking for.
A description of the combination of separate parts.
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composure (s) (noun), composures (pl)
1. A calm or tranquil state of mind; self-possession or self-control: Harriet's composure was shown by her relaxed and comfortable behavior even when she was under pressure to complete her chemistry assignment in the laboratory.
2. Steadiness of mind under stress: Celia's father accepted her problems with composure and her mother also reacted with equanimity.
3. Calm and steady control over the emotions: As a social worker, it takes strong composure to listen to the information that clients provide about their hazardous lives.
A calmness or repose; especially, the appearance of being that way.
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A calm tranquility and state of mind.
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Self control and equanimity under a difficult situation.
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comprehensive (adjective), more comprehensive, most comprehensive
Including many, most, or a lot of things: Henry had a comprehensive understanding of computer programming and so he was very busy providing his skills for many projects.
Capable of easily understanding.
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compulsion (kuhn PUHL shuhn) (s) (noun), compulsions (pl)
A desire or feeling that a person has that he or she must do something; an irresistible inclination to do or repeat an activity: Richard, an international traveler and explorer, described his compulsion to visit far away places as something he could not resist and he frequently felt a compulsion to climb the highest mountains wherever he went.

Tom's doctor described him as having a compulsion to repeatedly wash his hands even when they were clean.

A condition in which a person is obliged or forced to do something.
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compunction (s) (noun), compunctions (pl)
1. A strong feeling of uneasiness or anxiety of the conscience caused by regret or guilt for doing something wrong or causing emotional pain and suffering: Jack had a feeling of compunction when he couldn't celebrate his mother's 90th birthday with her because he had to work late in order to complete a project that he was working on.
2. Any uneasiness or hesitation about an action being proper: Wouldn't anyone have compunctions about meeting the Queen and not knowing what to wear or what to say on such an occasion?
3. A sting of conscience or a pang of doubt aroused by doing something wrong: Rodney was filled with compunction after he lied to his parents when he told them that he had done his homework for school; however, he actually spent his time reading comic magazines instead.

Compunction is a strong, sudden, and unpleasant regret or emotion of guilt.

Strong feeling of guilt or regret doing something wrong.
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Self reproach for wrong doing.
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Not feeling guilty for doing an illegal act.
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concatenation (kan KAT uh nay" shuhn, kuhn kat" uh NAY shuhn) (s) (noun), concatenations (pl)
A series of interconnected things, events, or happenings that take place and lead to a result: Jerome was able to organize some concatenations for his special web site.

An extraordinary concatenation of factors contributed to Norman's success as a computer programmer.

When the man said that the concatenation of unfortunate events had depleted his "larder", he was referring to a cool room or a cupboard for storing food and such larders were used by people before the common use of refrigerators.

A chain of events or an order of things that take place.
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concede (verb), concedes; conceded; conceding
1. To admit or to acknowledge something, often grudgingly or with reluctance: Jane thought it would be best to concede to her mother that she had eaten some cake before dinner, even though she was on a diet to reduce her weight.
2. To allow, surrender, relinquish, or to yield control; such as, a right or privilege to another person, organization, or country: After serving as a secretary in the company for two years, Doris was going to concede her position to another member of her department.
3. To accept and to acknowledge defeat in a contest, debate, election, or fight; often without waiting for the final result or decision: As soon as the political candidate recognized that she would not win the election, she decided to concede her loss and so she gave a short good-bye speech.
4. To allow an opponent or opposing team to gain something valuable; usually, a goal or points: While playing chess, Tim made up his mind to concede the game to his rival, who was able to win with a checkmate.
5. Etymology: from Latin concedere, "to give way, to yield"; from com-, "together, with" + cedere, "to go, to grant, to give way"
To acknowledge or to admit that something is true.
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To yield or to give up.
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conceited (adjective), more conceited, most conceited
Characterized by having a very high opinion of oneself or showing an excessive amount of egotistical pride for himself or herself: The author of the book was a brilliant creator of novels; however, he was also considered a very conceited compiler of literature by many other writers.
Relating to having too high an opinion of oneself.
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Descriptive of an exaggerated opinion of one's abilities.
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concerted (adjective), more concerted, most concerted
Pertaining to doing something by agreement or in combination together as a group: When working on the geography project, the four students made their concerted efforts to organize and to present their report about the Mojave Desert to their geography class.
Combined or done together.
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Planned or accomplished together.
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Mutually arranged or agreed to do something.
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Related "together" units: greg-; inter-; struct-.

There are additional units that include com-, co-, cog-, col-, con-, cor- entries which you can find by typing the word you are looking for when you open the Search Box below.