grapho-, graph-, -graph, -graphy, -grapher, -graphia

(Greek: to scratch; to write, to record, to draw, to describe; that which is written or described)

As indicated at the bottom of this page, there is a significantly large number of graphic word-entry groups in this unit. Such an extensive listing is provided to show how important the grapho- element is to the English language.

ethographic
ethography
The description of the morals and characteristics of mankind.
etymograph (s) (noun), etymographs (pl)
A written rendition of the history of a particular written symbol that is used to represent speech or an element of a grapheme.
etymographer (s) (noun), etymograhers (pl)
1. Someone who researches and writes about the historical accuracy of the origins, derivations, and spellings of words.
2. A person who studies the history of words by breaking them down into basic elements or by tracing them back to their earliest known structures and writing about the changes in their forms and meanings.
etymographic (adjective), more etymographic, most etymographic
A reference to the historical accuracy of spelling or origins of words: The etymographic approach to ancient symbols involves the method of producing or discovering additional levels of meanings by bringing into play the multitudes of readings a specific grapheme can have within the writing system to which it belongs.
etymographist (s) (noun), etymographists (pl)
1. A person who researches and writes about the historical accuracy of the origins, spellings, and derivations of words.
2. Anyone who studies the history of words by breaking them down into basic elements or by tracing them back to their earliest known structures and trying to explain the changes in their forms and meanings.
etymography (s) (noun), etymographies (pl)
1. The written historical accuracy of the origins and spellings of words.
2. The study of why characters are written as they are.
fauxtography (s) (noun), fauxtographies (pl)
Abnormal images; such as, photographs and videos circulating in publications, on the internet, TV, etc.: The distorted picture of the actor on the front cover of the scandal magazine appeared to be fauxtography.

Some fauxtography is real, while some have aspects that have been faked; so, photographs about public figures or events are especially worth cautious viewing.

As images and audio editing in fauxtography become easier for more people to use, whether for their own entertainment or to manipulate public perceptions, truth becomes increasingly elusive; so, people need to be more critical about what they see and hear.

fetal electrocardiography
The recording of the electrical currents of the fetal (unborn child) heart.
fetography
Radiography of the fetus within the uterus.

This procedure has been virtually replaced by ultrasound.

fistulography
An angiographic examination of a fistula, such as to check on patency of an arteriovenous fistula used for hemodialysis access.

A fistula is an abnormal passageway in the body. The fistula may go from the body surface into a blind pouch, into an internal organ, or go between two internal organs.

fluororoentgenography
Images that are produced on a fluorescent screen by X-rays.
fluviograph
An instrument for measuring and recording automatically the rise and fall of a river.
gammography
Imaging by means of gamma radiation; scintigraphy (a diagnostic test in which a two-dimensional picture of a body radiation source is obtained through the use of radioisotopes).
gastrograph

Related "writing" word units: glypto-; gram-; scrib-, script-.