stato-, stat-, sta-, -static, -stasi, staso-, -stasis, -stasia, -stacy, -stitute, -stitution, -sist

(Latin: standing, to stay, to make firm, fixed; cause to stand, to put, to place, to put in place, to remain in place; to stand still)

microstat
misstatement
mycostasis
mycostat
neoimpressionism
1. A 19th-century movement in painting, led by the pointillist Georges Seurat, that favored stricter and more formal techniques of composition than impressionism.
2. The doctrines and methods of a group of artists of the 19th century, based on a more strictly scientific practice of impressionist technique.
nephrapostasis
obstacle
An obstruction that stands in the way or hinders progress, and which must be removed or surmounted or circumvented before it is possible to continue.
obstetrics (noun) (plural form used as a singular)
1. The branch of medical science concerned with childbirth and caring for and treating women in or in connection with childbirth.
2. Etymology: from about 1819, from obstetric, 1742; from Modern Latin obstetricus, "pertaining to a midwife"; from obstetrix (genitive of obstetricis), "midwife". Literally, "one who stands opposite (the woman giving birth)"; from obstare, "to stand opposite to".
obstinacy
obstinancy
obstinate (adjective), more obstinate, most obstinate
1. Pertaining to keeping an opinion, a purpose, or a course of action in spite of reasons for not doing it or arguments against such behavior: Mark, the teacher, was trying to deal with an obstinate pupil who refused to put his cell phone away during class; so, the boy was sent to the principal.

Despite the dangers of severe flood warnings, Ted and his family were too obstinate to leave their house for a safer area.

2. Relating to being very difficult to deal with and not easily overcome or removed: There was an obstinate stain on Jim's shirt which could not be removed even though it was washed twice.
Determined to have one's own way even when it is unacceptable and unreasonable.
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obstinately
omnidistance
ophthalmostasis
The relative position of the eye in the orbit.
oust (verb), ousts; ousted; ousting
1. The act or condition of ejecting, forcing out, or supplanting.
2. To force out or to remove, as from a place e or position; to eject.
3. In law, the act of forcing someone out of possession or occupancy of material property to which he or she is entitled; illegal or wrongful dispossession.
4. Etymology: existing since about 1420, from Anglo-French oster (1292), from Old French oster, "put out, keep off, remove, avert"; from Latin obstare, "to stand opposite to, to block, to hinder"; from ob-, "against" + stare, "to stand".

Related word families intertwined with "to place, placing, to put; to add; to stay; to attach" word units: fix-; pon-; prosth-; the-, thes-.