regi-, reg-, rec-, rex-

(Latin: to direct, to rule, to lead straight, to keep straight; to guide, to govern)

Although it does not appear to be correct, all of the words in this unit etymologically come from this family group. Some words; such as, surge and its related formats, may be presented as separate units; however, they originally evolved from this family unit.

resource
resourceful (adjective), more resourceful, most resourceful
1. A reference to a person who is good at thinking of ways to accomplish things, quick witted: It takes resourceful leaders of companies to invest in products that result in profits.
2. Relating to a creative, innovative, and ingenious individual who is in charge of actions that produce desired objectives: Glenda was a resourceful supervisor who made excellent decisions with her staff to develop the best approach to revealing what was really going on in the world on her TV shows.
3. Etymology: from Latin resurgere, "to rise again"; from re-, "again" + surgere, "to rise."
Relating to the ability to think out the best way to do something.
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resourcefulness
resourceless
resourcelessness
resurge (verb), resurges; resurged; resurging
1. To rise or to grow strong again; to experience a resurgence.
2. To sweep forward or back to life in a powerful way.
resurgence (s) (noun), resurgences (pl)
1. A rising or a tendency to return: Recently there has been a resurgence of economic improvement in some countries.
2. Etymology: from Latin resurgere, "to rise again"; from re-, "again" + surgere, "to rise."
A returning again.
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A rising again into life.
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resurgent (s) (adjective)
1. A rising again as to new life and vigor.
2. Experiencing or tending to bring about a renewal or a revival.
3. A rising or becoming stronger again.
resurrect (rez" uh REKT) (verb), resurrects; resurrected; resurrecting
1. To cause to become alive again: Patricia's plant was so wilted that she was convinced that it could neither be resurrected nor thrive again.
2. To return from the dead: In the novel Sam was reading, Jonathan, the main character, was resurrected, or brought back to life, by a magician.
3. To restore from a depressed, inactive, or unused condition: After bringing up the old coffee grinder from the basement, and after cleaning it, Roland resurrected it and utilized it again for grinding his coffee in the morning!
4. To bring back into practice, notice, or use: Ted's family sang several Christmas carols in their home after finally resurrecting their old piano to provide the music.
To raise from the dead or bring back to life.
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resurrection (s) (noun), resurrections (pl)
1. Revival from an inactivity and disuse: After sorting out the old clothes from the attic, Nancy decided on the resurrection of some of them which were still quite useful and of good quality.
2. The act of rising from the dead or returning to life: A patient who was being medically treated suddenly died and the resuscitation by the medical staff resulted in her resurrection and reviving so she could go home after additional weeks of recovery at the hospital.
3. The process of bringing back to practice, notice, or use; a revival: The resurrection of some fashions from long ago can return to be quite modern, like black-rimed glasses or tight-fitting jeans.
4. The revival of something old, inactive, or long out of use: The resurrection of an old story prompted former memories of Mike's past when he had lived as a boy on a farm.
resurrectionary (adjective)
1. That which can be brought back into use or to be noticed again.
2. A reference to bringing back to life or to rising from the dead.
royal
royalism
royalist
royally

Cross references of word families related directly, or indirectly, to: "master, lead, leading, ruler, ruling, govern": -agogic; agon-; arch-; -crat; dom-; gov-; magist-; poten-; tyran-.