-ous, -ious, -eous

(Latin: full of or having the qualities of; in chemistry, a suffix denoting that the element indicated by the name bearing it, has a valence lower than that denoted by the termination -ic; as, nitrous, sulphurous, etc., as contrasted with nitric, sulphuric, etc.)

Only a small number of the hundreds of examples are presented because there are just too many to include at this time.

duplicitous (adjective), more duplicitous, most duplicitous
1. Descriptive of being deceitful or pretending to feel one way and actually being the opposite in speech or behavior: "The young man's excessive attention to the elderly woman at the party was recognized by her son as nothing more than a duplicitous way to steal her valuable necklace."
2. A dishonest action that is meant to trick someone or others: "The investigator exposed the financial investor's duplicitous techniques to get people to buy stock in his company."
efficacious (adjective), more efficacious, most efficacious
A reference of something which is capable of producing a desired effect or result: The medicine that the doctor prescribed was supposed to have an efficacious healing of Sam's painful throat.

The politician was rewarded for her efficacious efforts by being elected as governor again.

Pertaining to the power to produce an intended effect.
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egregious (adjective), more egregious, most egregious
1. Flagrant, gross, or intolerable: The contractor committed an egregious error in the construction of Marian's house because when it rained, water leaked through the roof into the attic.
2. Extraordinary in some bad way; glaring; flagrant: Ron made an egregious error in his financial report and so he was recognized as an egregious liar.
3. Etymology: from Latin egregius, from the phrase ex grege, "rising above the flock", from ex-, "out of" + grege, ablative of grex, "herd, flock".

The sense of "disapproving", which is now predominant, came about in the 16th century; but it originally referred to something ironic and is not from the Latin meaning, which etymologically simply meant "exceptional".

Being offensive.
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Being offensive.
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Being offensive.
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emulous (adjective), more emulous, most emulous
1. Referring to someone who is eager or ambitious to equal or to surpass others: In the sport competition of aquatic locomotion, Nils was certainly emulous in that he wanted to be the best swimmer!
2. Characterized or prompted by a spirit of rivalry: The two friends were both quite emulous, in that each one was trying to get the best grade in math of all the students in that class.
Ready to equal another person.
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envious (adjective), more envious, most envious
Feeling, or showing, a desire to have what others have: It is obvious that Jim's fellow workers were envious of his success as a technical innovator.

Envious programmers desired to know how Roy was able to set up such an efficient web site.

eponyous
equanimous (ee" kwuh NIM uhs) (adjective), more equanimous, most equanimous
1. A reference to having mental or emotional stability or composure; especially, under tension or strain; calmness; equilibrium: Sometimes it is very difficult for a teacher to be equanimous during a lesson when the students have to be reminded not to talk so often.
2. Relating to being calm and in control of the emotions; primarily in a difficult situation: Jane was quite equanimous, or self-possessed, when being told by the authorities that she had violated the law by parking in the hospital driveway; especially, since it wasn't her car!
equivorous
To eat the flesh of horses.
erroneous (adjective), more erroneous, most erroneous
1. Containing or derived from a mistake: Based on the information at the time of publication, the scientist reached an erroneous conclusion.
2. Descriptive of being wrong, based on an incorrect assumption, or containing something that is not right: Steve was told that his facts were correct, but his erroneous conclusions were not acceptable.
3. A reference to straying from what is moral, decent, proper, etc.: Harriet's son committed an erroneous action by staying up beyond his bedtime and watching TV even though he was going to school in the morning.
euphilous
exogamous
expeditious (ek" spi DISH uhs) (adjective), more expeditious, most expeditious
1. Descriptive of something that is prompt, speedy, immediate, and efficient: This emergency warning of an epidemic requires expeditious action so more people can avoid getting sick.
2. A reference to an answer that is quickly given: Jim gave his mother an expeditious response to her question as he was leaving to catch his bus to go to school.
3. Etymology: whenever anyone is expeditious (fast) about doing anything, it is because that person's feet are not tied up. This is because the Latin word pes (a stem of ped) means "foot" and ex means "out of".
exsanguious (adjective), more exsanguious, most exsanguious
1. Descriptive of being destitute of blood, or lacking blood.
2. A reference to being without true, or red, blood; such as, insects.
extemporaneous (adjective), more extemporaneous, most extemporaneous
1. Relating to a performance without any preparation: After receiving so much applause after completing the recital, the pianist gave an extemporaneous encore.
2. Pertaining to being prepared in advance but delivered without notes: Alfred spent the whole afternoon thinking and writing down what he wanted to say at his farewell ceremony the next evening so that he could give an extemporaneous speech without using his rough draft from the day before.
3. Referring to speaking without preparation or notes; literally, "out of the moment": Rick gave a short extemporaneous speech after he received the first prize in the debate club.
4. Descriptive of taking place with little or no prior preparation or practice: Dr. Thomas gave an extemporaneous talk on the importance of good health at the meeting because the main speaker suddenly became ill with a fever!
extraneous (adjective), more extraneous, most extraneous
1. Referring to something coming in from the outside: During the soloist’s recital, the audience could hear the extraneous sounds from the church bells down the street!
2. Descriptive of something which is not important or relevant: Mr. Jackson explained to his student, Judy, that there were too many extraneous sentences in her essay which were not related to the topic she had chosen to write about.
3. Etymology: from Latin extraneus, "external, strange"; literally "that which is without" or "outside".
A reference to what is not essential or a part of the situation.
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