-ous, -ious, -eous

(Latin: full of or having the qualities of; in chemistry, a suffix denoting that the element indicated by the name bearing it, has a valence lower than that denoted by the termination -ic; as, nitrous, sulphurous, etc., as contrasted with nitric, sulphuric, etc.)

Only a small number of the hundreds of examples are presented because there are just too many to include at this time.

tempestuous (adjective), more tempestuous, most tempestuous
1. A reference to something being affected by violent storms: Last night, Lewis and Mary experienced the most tempestuous thunder and rain downpour that they have ever experienced before!
2. Relating to an emotionally turbulent and strong response: Sometimes Floyd and his colleague had tempestuous arguments about how to complete certain objectives that they were striving to achieve.
Conveying a violent reaction.
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tenacious (adjective), more tenacious, most tenacious
1. A reference to something which is not easily pulled apart: The glue gave the broken pieces of the vase tenacious connections so it was almost as good as it was before it fell on the floor.
2. Relating to someone who is persistent and fully focused on achieving his or her objective: Ken was making a tenacious effort to complete his assignments as a reporter despite the dangers he was experiencing in the battle zone.
3. Relating to a determination to achieve a desired result as time and resources permit: The compiler of the contents of the special dictionary is a tenacious worker who is determined to provide much better contents for users who want to improve their vocabulary skills.

Computers are tenacious devices that are capable of retaining large amounts of information and of presenting it whenever a user wants to use it.

4. Physical conditions which can't be remedied or made better: There are some tenacious ailments that doctors are unable to cure and which last for months or even years and come to an end only when a patient dies.
Tending to hold firmly and strongly; unyielding.
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terminus (s) (noun); termini, terminuses (pl)
The end or location of the final destination of a journey: The passenger vehicle pulled into the bus terminus several hours late because of severe weather conditions on the road.
terraceous
Earthen or of the earth.
thalassinous
Sea green.
theophilous (adjective)
A reference to the love of God.
timorous (adjective), more timorous, most timorous
1. Characterized by or indicating fear: Young Timothy cried out with a timorous voice while sleeping when he had a nightmare that he was drowning in the ocean near where he was living in California.
2. Etymology: from Latin timor, "fear"; from timeo, "to be afraid".
Referring to being easily frightened.
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tortuous (adjective), more tortuous, most tortuous
1. A reference to something that has many turns or bends: There are some mountain passes which are tortuous for drivers because of the multitudes of winding curves that exist.

Tortuous reasoning refers to a person's logical thinking which goes in different directions from what some might consider normal or acceptable.

2. Descriptive of anything that is extremely complex or intricate: Some legal arguments presented in court trials can be very tortuous, making them very difficult to understand by those who are not lawyers.
3. Pertaining to being devious or deceitful: Thomas was not very straightforward and he was quite tortuous as he tried to make his wife believe that he loved her even though she knew that he was having a relationship with another woman.
4. Etymology: from Latin tortuosus, from tortus, "twisting, a twist, a winding"; from Latin torquere, "to twist".
Full of twists or curves and winding in different directions.
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tremulous (adjective), more tremulous, most tremulous
1. Characterized by or affected with a quivering or wavering voice or speech: At the police station Miss Simmons was quite nervous and spoke in a very tremulous and frightened way regarding the stealing of her car by a thief.
2. Etymology: from Latin tremulus, "shaking, quivering" from tremere, "to shake, to quake, to quiver."
Referring to a shaking or a weak voice.
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ubiquitous (adjective), more ubiquitous, most ubiquitous
Present, or seeming to be present or existing, everywhere at the same time: The ubiquitous sports star was seen on several different TV programs at 8 p.m.

The ubiquitous weather was covering many states in America with below freezing temperatures, snow, and ice during the first days of January, 2014.

Seeming to be everywhere at the same time.
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Existing everywhere at the same time.
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ulcerous
1. Of the nature of an ulcer.
2. Affected with ulceration.
ultravirtuous
unauspicious [inauspicious is the preferred spelling] (s) (adjective)
Not favorable, not successful: "Steve's unauspicious hopes indicated his pessimism about the undertaking."
uncarnivorous
Non-meat eater.
unconscious (adjective), more unconscious, most unconscious)
1. Relating to not knowing within oneself; unaware, heedless: In psychology, an unconscious situation that applies to mental or psychic processes of which a person is not aware of but which has a powerful effect on his or her attitudes and behaviors.
2. A reference to not being realized or known as existing in oneself.
5. Etymology: from un-, "not" + conscious or not "knowing" or "not being aware".