sola-, sol-

(Latin: comfort, encourage, cheer)

consolable (adjective), more consolable, most consolable
Relating to being less sad or not as disappointed: Adam was not a consolable person after he had wrecked his car, which then had to be towed to the junk yard.
consolation (s) (noun), consolations (pl)
That which makes someone feel less disappointment or sadness: Jim's kind words and concern for his sister Sally at the hospital were a consolation for her.
consolatory (adjective), more consolatory, most consolatory
A reference to anything that is intended to make anyone who is disturbed or dejected feel better: Visits to Mrs. Carsten, the police officer's widow, by her fellow church members were the most consolatory things they could have done at the time.
consolatrix (s) (noun), consolatrices (pl)
A woman who tries to comfort a person at a time of affliction, sorrow, disheartenment, or distress: As the church consolatrix, Eve tried to ease the pain of grievousness that the children suffered when their father and mother were killed in a car accident.
console (verb), consoles; consoled; consoling
To comfort in time of grief or loss, or to try to help an individual to feel better: Burton and Diana made sincere efforts to console their son Randy, who was crying because his dog was run over and seriously injured on the street in front of their house.

Rebecca consoled herself when she lost her job with the thought that things could be much worse.

To make someone feel less sad or disappointed by comforting or cheering up.
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disconsolate (adjective), more disconsolate, most disconsolate
Pertaining to being utterly dejected, cheerless, forlorn, or gloomy: Survivors of the tornadoes were even more disconsolate when they saw the destruction that resulted.
Dejected, gloomy, forlorn.
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Sad and disappointed.
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Very unhappy and dismal.
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inconsolable (adjective), more inconsolable, most inconsolable
Extremely sad and very disturbed and unable to be comforted: Mildred was most inconsolable when she heard that her brother and his wife died in the airplane crash the day before.
solace (s) (noun) (usually no plural)
Comfort in bereavement, distress, or misfortune: Jim and Jane took solace in the knowledge that their mother was not alone when she passed away while they were traveling in France during the summer.
Easing of grief or discomfort.
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Comfort in grief or a calamity.
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solacement (s) (noun), solacements (pl)
A person or materiality that gives a feeling of comfort to someone who is sad or depressed: Joanna provided solacement for her brother by cooking his favorite meal after he had slipped and fallen on the icy sidewalk and had broken his wrist.
solatium (s) (noun), solatia (pl)
1. Compensation for emotional suffering, injured feelings, various inconveniences, griefs, etc. (as opposed to physical injury or financial loss, etc.): An acceptable solatium in the form of an apology was offered to Mrs. Evans by the manager when the salesman was rude to her.

In Iraq and Afghanistan, the U.S. Department of Defense or DOD, gave monetary assistance in the form of solatia and condolence payments to Iraqi and Afghan people who had relatives who were killed or injured; and to those who had property damage as a result of U.S. or coalition forces’ actions during the war.

—United States Government Accountability Office;
Washington, DC 20548
2. Etymology: from Latin solacium, from solari, "to console, to soothe, to assuage"; literally, solace, comfort.
Compensation for injuries or hurt feelings.
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