mastoido-, mastoid- +

(Greek: breast; used in the specialized sense as "of or pertaining to the breast-shaped mastoid process of the temporal bone)

atlantomastoid
A reference to the atlas and the mastoid process (the nipple-like projection of the petrous, rocky or hard, part of the temporal bone).

The atlas is the first vertebra in the neck. It supports the head at the base of the skull and is also known as the first cervical vertebra.

cleidomastoid
The collar bone which articulates with the shoulder on one end and the sternum (breast bone) on the other combined to form the sternocleidomastoid which is one of two muscles located on the front of the neck that serve to turn the head from side to side.
mastoid
The rounded protrusion of bone just behind the ear.

The mastoid was once thought to look like a breast; hence its name.

mastoid angle
The posterior inferior corner of the parietal bone where it articulates with the mastoid part of the temporal bone.
mastoid process
1. A nipple-shaped process of the mastoid portion of the temporal bone extending downward and forward behind the external auditory meatus.

The auditory, or acoustic, meatus consists of two passages in the ear; the external acoustic meatus leads from the auricle to the tympanic membrane (eardrum) and the internal acoustic meatus which is for the passage of nerves and blood vessels.

2. The nipple-like projection of the petrous (hard, stony) part of the temporal bone or a very complex bone situated in the side of the skull of most mammals and containing the organ of hearing.
mastoidal
The process of the temporal bone behind the ear at the base of the skull.
mastoidalgia
Pain in the mastoid region, shaped like a breast, a bony protuberance on the skull, found behind the ear in many vertebrates, including humans.
mastoidectomy
The surgical removal of mastoid air cells during which the surgery may extend into the middle ear.

Mastoid air cells are open, air-containing spaces in the skull, behind the ear.

The surgery used to be a common way to treat an infection in the mastoid air cells, which usually came from an ear infection that spread to the nearby bone in the skull.

Mastoidectomy is now seldom needed because the infections are commonly treated with antibiotics; however, this surgery may be used to treat other problems; such as, cholesteatoma, complications of the otitis media, or used as a surgical approach for cochlear implant insertion.

mastoiditis
Inflammation of the mastoid antrum (air space in the mastoid portion (air cells of various sizes and shapes in the mastoid process of the temporal bone communicating with the middle ear and the mastoid cells); usually the result of an infection of the middle ear, with which the mastoid cells communicate.

Mastoiditis more often follows a sore throat and a respiratory infection, but it can also be caused by diseases such as diphtheria, measles, and scarlet fever. Symptoms include earache and a ringing in the ears.

mastoidotomy
Incision of the mastoid process which is a conical projection at the base of the mastoid portion of the temporal bone.
meatomastoidectomy (s) (noun), meatomastoidectomies (pl)
An incision of the mastoid process to enlarge the passage in the nipple-shaped mastoid portion of the temporal bone that extends downward and forward behind the external auditory meatus (opening).

The auditory, or acoustic, meatomastoidectomies consists of two passages in the ear; the external acoustic meatus leads from the auricle to the tympanic membrane (eardrum) and the internal acoustic meatus which is for the passage of nerves and blood vessels.

otomastoiditis
Mastoiditis (inflammation of the rounded protrusion of bone just behind the ear once thought to look like the breast) combined with otitis media, usually of the suppurative type (ripen and generate pus).
paramastoid process
In some skulls, a downward projection from the lateral part of the jugular process (an occasional process of bone extending downward from the jugular process of the occipital bone (bone forming the rear and rear bottom of the skull in humans) which may articulate (having joints where separation may occur naturally) with the transverse process (either of the two bony projections on the sides of a vertebra) of the atlas (the uppermost bone of the vertebral column, which supports the skull).
paramastoiditis
Inflammation of the squamous portion of the temporal bone, from the extension following mastoiditis.
squamomastoid
Concerning the squamous (scaly or platelike) and the mastoid portions (rounded protrusion of bone just behind the ear) of the temporal bone or the portion of the temporal bone lying behind the external opening of the ear and below the temporal line and containing mastoid cells and antrum (cavity or chamber).