-ity

(Latin: suffix used to form abstract nouns expressing act, state, quality, property, or condition corresponding to an adjective)

veracity (s) (noun), veracities (pl)
1. The honesty or truthfulness of a person when expressing herself or himself: When Mr. Jones, the candidate for mayor of the town, was giving his speech, his veracity was questioned by many of the listeners.
2. Correctness or accuracy of the facts: When fictional stories or novels are written, veracity is certainly not one of the most important elements or aspects presented!
3. Etymology: from Latin veracis, "truthful" from verus "true."
The conformity to the truth.
© ALL rights are reserved.

Go to this Word A Day Revisited Index
so you can see more of Mickey Bach's cartoons.

verbality
1. The quality of being (merely) verbal; that which consists of mere words or verbiage.
2. Verbal expressions or phrases.
3. The quality appropriate to a verb.
verbosity (s) (noun)
The state or quality of being verbose; superfluity of words; excessive wordiness, prolixity (wordy and tedious): "The readers thought he used too much verbosity in his article."
verity
1. The quality of being true or real.
2. Something that is true, especially a statement or principle that is accepted as a fact.
virginity
1. The quality or condition of being a virgin.
2. The state of being pure, sexually unsullied, or sexually untouched.

Virginity Restoration

Once lost, virginity can never really be replaced; however, modern medicine now offers women a nearly perfect physical simulation of their lost innocence.

  • Hymenoplasty, the surgical reconstruction of the hymen broken during a women's first experience of intercourse; or, increasingly, during demanding exercise, or as a result of a collision or fall by women who have never had sex, has prompted a growing number of young betrothed women in France to make a last-ditch attempt to avoid the humiliation, repudiation, and possibly violence that could result from husbands and families discovering that their wedding night had not been their first sexual experience.
  • Hymenoplasty has generated renewed attention in France because of a court ruling in the northern city of Lille, which annulled a marriage on the basis of a husband's complaint that his wife had falsely promised that she was a virgin.
  • Although the decision made no mention of religion, the fact that the couple were Muslim sparked complaints that France's strictly secular state is being undermined by traditional Arab cultural strictures.
  • The court ruling also infuriated feminists, who saw its acceptance of prior sexual experience as grounds for annulment as similar to treating marriage as the equivalent of a commercial transaction "in which the buyer had discovered a hidden flaw in his purchase.
  • Even though an appeal by France's Justice Ministry resulted in the Lille ruling being overturned, the storm it provoked has focused media attention on young Muslim women who turn to hymenoplasty to avoid the fate of the repudiated Lille bride.
  • Although the overturning of the Lille verdict removed the risk non-virgin Muslim brides could find themselves dragged to court on fraud charges by infuriated husbands, the cultural pressures some face remain sufficiently great that many will continue turning to hymenoplasty to restore their semblance of chastity.
—Based on information and excerpts from
"The Dilemma of 'Virginity' Restoration" by By Bruce Crumley in Paris, France;
Time in partnership with CNN; July 13, 2008.
virility
The period of life during which a person of the male sex is in full vigor; mature or fully developed manhood or masculine force.
virtuality
1. The inherent ability or potential to come into existence.
2. Essential nature or being, apart from external form or embodiment.
3. A virtual (as opposed to an actual) thing, capacity, etc.; a potentiality.
virtuosity
Manly qualities or character.
vivacity
1. Lively, filled with animation and spirit.
2. Liveliness and high-spiritedness.
voracity
The quality or character of being voracious; greediness in eating.
vulnerability (s) (noun), vulnerabilities (pl)
1. Susceptibility to injury or damage.

In Greek mythology, Achilles' mother tried to make him impossible to be injured, hurt, or wounded by dipping him into the magical waters of the River Styx; however, the heel by which she held him made this vulnerability the cause of his death when an arrow hit him in his heel during a military battle.

Achilles was invulnerable except on his heel where his mother held him when she dipped him into the River Styx.
Word Info image © ALL rights reserved.

2. The degree to which a population, species, ecosystem, agricultural system, or other biological entity is unable to cope with the adverse effects of climate changes.
zonality
Zonal distribution; zonal character.