glob-, glom-

(Latin: a round body, a ball; round, a sphere; the earth; "sphere" came from Latin globus, "round mass, sphere"; related to gleba, "clod, soil, land". Sense of "planet earth," or a three-dimensional map of it, appeared first in 1553)

earth spinning.
eglomerate
To unwind, as a thread from a ball.
englobe
1. To take in by a spheroidal body; said of the ingestion of bacteria and other foreign bodies by the phagocytes.
2. To ingest particles by the process of phagocytosis (endocytosis of particulate material; such as, microorganisms or cell fragments).

Endocytosis is medically defined as the uptake by a cell of material from the environment by invagination of its plasma membrane; it includes both phagocytosis and pinocytosis.

A phagocyte is any cell capable of ingesting particulate matter; for example, a microphage, macrophage, or monocyte. Such cells ingest microorganisms and other particulate antigens that are opsonized (coated with antibody or complement), a process mediated by specific cell-surface receptors.

euglobulin
Any of a class of simple proteins that are soluble in dilute salt solutions and insoluble in distilled water.
glob
1. A small drop; a globule of a liquid.
2. A soft thick lump or mass; such as, a glob of mashed potatoes.
3. An usually rounded quantity or lump of some plastic or moldable substance.
global
1. Of or relating to a globe; such as, the eye.
2. Of or involving the entire world.
3. Considered in its entirety; with attention to the broadest view of a situation.
4. A reference to the whole world; worldwide; involving the entire earth; universal; comprehensive.
5. Globular; globe-shaped.
6. Pertaining to, or using a terrestrial or celestial globe; having the shape of a globe; spherical.
Callipygian Venus statue
global tectonics
Earth movements and interactions on a global scale; especially, as they relate to the causes and results of the dynamics of the crustal plates and sea-floor spreading.
globalism
1. The policy or practice of conducting an activity on an international basis rather than a national or local one; for example, a corporation that sells its goods to markets throughout the world and that locates its facilities and workforce in various countries according to whatever the need may be.
2. Another term for globalization.
globalization (U.S.), globalisation (British)
1. To make global or worldwide in scope or application.
2. A modern term used to describe the changes in societies and the world economy that result from dramatically increased international trade and cultural exchange.

It describes the increase of trade and investing due to the falling of barriers and the interdependence of countries.

3. The tendency over time for the nations and citizens of the world to become more closely interconnected, as a result of factors; such as, increased trade and travel, higher rates of immigration, and the spread of mass media including film and television.
4. Any specific instance of the trend; that is, the globalization of the internet from its beginning as a small network in the United States.
globalize (U.S.), globalise (British)
1. Something made world-wide in scope or application.
2. To extend to other parts of the world or to all parts of the globe; to make worldwide.
globate
Spherical; globeshaped.
globe
1. A body with the shape of a sphere, especially a representation of the earth in the form of a hollow ball; the earth, a planet; the planet on which we live.
2. A sphere on which a map (especially of the earth) is represented.
3. A spherical or bowllike container, especially a glass cover for a light bulb.
4. A sphere emblematic of sovereignty; an orb.
globetrot
1. To travel throughout the world; especially, regularly or frequently.
2. To travel often and widely, especially for sightseeing.
globetrotter
1. Someone who travels widely and often.
2. A person who travels widely about the world, especially someone who does it for the pleasure of sightseeing.
globic
Pertaining to a glomus.
globiferous
Having a round or globular tip.

Cross references of word families related directly, or indirectly, to: "land, ground, fields, soil, dirt, mud, clay, earth (world)": agra-; agrest-; agri-; agro-; argill-; choro-; chthon-; epeiro-; geo-; lut-; myso-; pedo-; pel-; rhyp-; soil-; sord-; terr-.


Related ball, sphere-word units: hemoglobin-; sphero-.