fac-, facil-, fact-, feas-, -feat, -fect, -feit, -facient, -faction, -fic-, -fy, -ficate, -fication

(Latin: to make, to do, to build, to cause, to produce; forming, shaping)

facility (s) (noun), facilities (pl)
1. A space or equipment necessary for doing something: The sports facility in Monica's town is quite good because it includes an indoor swimming pool, a sauna, and tennis courts.
2. An establishment set up to fulfill a particular function or to provide a particular service: Normally medical facilities are available in most places so people can go there to see a doctor about their illnesses or injuries.
3. The capability to do or to learn something very skilfully and easily; a natural talent or gift: After practicing the piano for just a week, Mildred showed her facility of playing a variety of musical performances for her teacher and classmates.
An easy way of doing something with skill.
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fact
Facta non verba.
1. "Deeds not words"
2. "Actions speak louder than words." Facta non verba is interpreted as indicating that a person who says that he or she wants to do something must actually do it or what has been said doesn't mean anything.
Facta sunt potentiora verbis.
Latin: Deeds are more powerful than words.
facticidal
Characterized by wanton disregard of facts.
faction (s) (noun), factions (pl)
1. A group of people who express shared beliefs or opinions that are different from others who are not part of the organization: The liberal faction of the political party in Sam's town got together to discuss their propositions before getting together with the other politicians.
2. A number of persons who are formed to seek some objective within a political party or a government: A faction suggests some quarrelsome dissent from the objectives pursued by those who are part of a majority of officials.
3. A literary work or film that is a mixture of fact and fiction: Some novels present history as a faction so the reader is always fascinated by the events that took place at some other time.
4. Etymology: from Latin factionem, "political party, class of people"; literally, "a making or doing", from facere, "to do".
Those who form a cohesive or contentious political group.
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factious (adjective), more factious, most factious
Relating to dissension, disharmony, or to conflicts: In some countries there are factious political groups who strive to overthrow their government or who want to separate from their country and be self-governing.
A reference to causing strifes or disputes.
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factiously
factiousness
Factis non verbis.
By deeds not words.
factitious (adjective), more factitious, most factitious
1. Pertaining to a contrived and insincere rather than genuine attitude or behavior: Becky gave her friend’s mother a factitious compliment about the lunch she had prepared, although Becky didn’t like it at all!
2. A reference to something that is being communicated in jest or as a joke: Max was being a factitious person when he suggested that he and his friends stay up all night to celebrate his birthday.
3. Lacking authenticity or genuineness; a sham: There are those who are convinced that the idea, or plan, by the President about taxes is a factitious proposal.
4. Etymology: from Latin factitius, "artificial"; from factus, past participle of facere, "to do".
An artificial enthusiasm.
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A phony or fraudulent behavior to impress others.
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factitiously
factitiousness
factitive
factitively