epi-, ep-

(Greek: above, over, on, upon; besides; in addition to; toward; among)

epistolary (adjective), more epistolary, most epistolary
1. A reference to something that is contained in or which is carried on by a written, typed, or printed communication: Some people still enjoy the forms of epistolary or graphic correspondence which they get in their mailbox next to their front door!
2. Related to anything that is written in the form of a series of letters: Messages have have been written in an epistolary style for centuries.
3. Etymology: it appeared in English four centuries after "epistle" and can be used to describe something related to or contained in an envelope by mail or messenger; as in, "epistolary greetings" or composed of letters; as in, "an epistolary story".

This term of epistolary came from the noun "epistle" which refers to "a composition written in the form of a letter to a particular person or group."

In its original sense, "epistle" referred to one of the 21 letters; such as, those from the apostle Paul which are found in the New Testament Bible.

Dating from the 13th century, epistle came into English by way of Anglo-French and Latin from the Greek noun epistol-, meaning "message" or "letter."

A reference to being in letters.
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Pertaining to letter writing.
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epistolatry (s) (noun), epistolatries (pl)
The worship of or an excessive devotion to letters or correspondence; such as, a piece of handwritten or printed text addressed to a recipient and typically sent by mail.
epistolic (adjective), more epistolic, most epistolic
Pertaining to letters in the form or style of written letters or messages.
epistolography (s) (noun), epistolographies (pl)
Written or composed letters or messages.
epitaph (EP i taf") (s) (noun), epitaphs (pl)
1. An inscription on a tombstone or monument commemorating the person buried there; occasionally, a brief composition characterizing a deceased person, and expressed as if intended to be inscribed on his tombstone: "After the accident in space, the students in the science exploration class were asked to write epitaphs about each of the astronauts who died."
2. A short speech or piece of writing celebrating the life of a recently deceased person: "The politician was asked to read the epitaph that the newspaper editor had written honoring the local city mayor who had died last week."

"An elegy is also known as a commemoration or a memoir for someone who has passed on."

"Sometimes an epitaph is a monumental lie."

Inscription on a tomb stone or a monument.
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epitapher
A writer of epitaphs.
epitaxis
Oriented overgrowth of a crystaline material on the surface of another with a similar structure, but with a different chemical composition.
epithet (EP i thet", EP uh thet") (s) (noun), epithets (pl)
1. A name or title given to express some quality considered characteristic of a person or thing: Here are two examples of epithets; "Richard, the Lion Hearted" and "America, the Beautiful".
2. Sometimes a disparaging name: An "egghead" is an epithet for someone who is an intellectual.

Strictly speaking, an epithet is not necessarily a derogatory term, but it is commonly used as a simple synonym for some term of abuse or slur; such as, there is no place for racial epithets on the radio or TV programs.
3. Etymology: from epitithenai, "to add on"; from epi-, "in addition" + tithenai, "to put".

A title for someone's behavior.
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The quality of person ot thing.
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epithetic
epithetical
epitoky, epitocy; epitokies, epitocies; epitokied, epitocied; epitokying, epitocying (verbs)
The production of sexual organs by what appears to be an asexual creature: "The production of such epitokies exist in the tail end of polychaetes or segmented worms including earthworms and aquatic blood-sucking leeches."
epitome (i PIT uh mee) (s) (noun), epitomes, epitomai (pl)
1. A condensation, summary, digest, synopsis, brief, abstract, or syllabus: The newspaper reporter wrote an epitome of the destructions that have been caused by the hurricanes in various countries.
2. The embodiment or summation of certain qualities: Henry is the epitome of strength because he works out at the fitness studio as often as possible.
3. A person or thing which is representative of or typical of the characteristics or general quality of a whole class or group: Ted's car was once the epitome of low cost transportation.
4. Etymology: from Greek epitome, "abridgement"; from Latin epitome, "to cut short, to cut down, or to cut into".
A concise summary.
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epitomize (verb), epitomizes; epitomized; epitomizing
To give a summary of a written work or some condition: The teacher had the students epitomize Shakespeare's story about "Julius Caesar".

The doctor epitomized his patient's physical illness as being healable, and healthy again in two weeks.

To reduce or to condense to a concise summary.
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epixylous
Growing on wood.
epizoic (ep" i ZOH ik)
1. Living on or attached to the body of an animal.
2. A reference to organisms that grows on live animals, but are not parasitic.

Related "above, over, beyond the normal, excessive" word units: hyper-; super-, supra-, sur; ultra-, ult-.