dis-, di-, dif-

(Latin: separation, apart, asunder; removal, away, from; negation, deprivation, undoing, reversal, utterly, completely; in different directions)

The meaning of dis- varies with different words; dif-, assimilated form of dis- before f; di-, form of dis- before b, d, g, l, m, n, r, and v.

disorientation
disparage (verb), disparages; disparaged; disparaging
1. To speak disapprovingly or contemptuously to someone or something: When Sara was given less pay as a secretary, she disparaged her boss as an idiot who didn't deserve to be a supervisor.
2. To talk about in a disrespectful way about anyone or anything; to belittle or "to put down": Sally's administrator was disparaging her as inefficient and unqualified and that she was lucky that he didn't fire her.
To lower in position with actions or words.
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To belittle or to slight and to reduce in esteem.
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disparagement (s) (noun) (no plural form)
1. Spoken of or treated in a belittling way.
2. Reproached, discredited and undervalued.
disparaging (adjective), more disparaging, most disparaging
A description of something or someone as being undervalued, defamed, deprecated, or discredited: Larry was heard making disparaging remarks about his fellow workers, saying that they took too many coffee breaks or were often supposedly "sick" on Fridays!
Undervaluing and speaking in a negative way about something.
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disparagingly (adverb), more disparagingly, most disparagingly
1. A reference to criticizing people in a way that shows that there is no respect or value for them.
2. Speaking of in a slighting or disrespectful way; belittling: Hank referred disparagingly to his car as an "old clunker".
disparate (adjective), more disparate, most disparate
Describing people or things that are fundamentally different in quality or kind; entirely dissimilar: The conversation was about disparate cultures that are building up in some countries as a result of so many foreign immigrants.
A reference to being unequal in character or personality.
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Essentially different or unlike in ideas or opinions.
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disparately (adverb), more disparately, most disparately
A reference to something containing or made up of fundamentally different and often incongruous elements which are utterly distinct in kind: "There was a disparately milder winter where Earl lived compared to where his brother had his home."
disparity (s) (noun), disparities (pl)
The condition or fact of being unequal, as in age, rank, or degree; inequality or different in some respect: There is a great disparity between the rich and the poor in every country.
A great difference in size or kind.
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dispassion
Absence of passion, bias, or emotion; condition of coolness toward someone or something; apathy.
dispassionate (adjective), more dispassionate, most dispassionate
1. A reference to being free from emotions or bias: The teacher heard both sides of the argument that the two students were having in a dispassionate and reasonable way and she gave her advice for a solution which would satisfy each one.
2. Conveying no influence by strong feeling; especially, not affected by personal or emotional involvements: The surgeon, who was performing the operation, maintained a dispassionate manner even though the patient was his son.
Uninfluenced by emotion or bias, impartial.
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dispassionately
In an impartially dispassionate manner: "Although he was looking at the other woman, he did it dispassionately."

"He spoke dispassionately about the accident he just had."

dispel (verb), dispels; dispelled; dispelling
1. To get rid of something in the mind; as if by, scattering in all directions; to disperse: Chris managed to dispel any doubts about his capabilities to do the job.

Shirley made an official statement to her colleagues to dispel any rumors that she was going to retire.

2. To drive away or off by or as if by scattering: A strong wind dispelled the thick fog along the beach where Ingrid was living.
To get rid of one thing for another one.
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dispeller
1. Someone who goes off in various directions; disperse; dissipate; for example, to dispel the dense dust with rain.
2. A person or a situation that causes something to vanish or which alleviates: "The doctor was a dispeller of her fears and imaginary concerns."
dispensable (adjective), more dispensable, most dispensable
1. Not essential; unimportant: Margaret had plenty of dispensable items of personal property to leave behind.
2. Capable of being administered, or distributed: Henry picked up the dispensable drugs from the pharmacy.
dispensary
A place where medicines are prepared and dispensed (distributed or weighted out in carefully determined portions); especially, a place where the poor can obtain medical advice and medicines gratuitously or at a nominal price.