cap-, cip-, capt-, cept-, ceive, -ceipt, -ceit, -cipient

(Latin: catch, seize, take, take hold of, receive, contain, hold; caught, taken prisoner)

Don't confuse the words in this cap-, cip- unit with those in the capit-, capt-, "head; leader, chief", or "first" unit of words.

participation (s) (noun), participations (pl)
Etymology: from Late Latin participationem, participatio, a noun of action from the stem of Latin participare, "participate"; from particeps, participis, "partaker"' from pars, partis, "part" + -cip-, a form of the stem capere, "to take".
participle (s) (noun), participles (pl)
Etymology: a variant of participe, from Latin participium; literally, "a sharing, a partaking"; from particeps, "partaker". In the grammatical sense, the Latin translates Gk. metokhe "sharer, partaker," and the idea is "partaking" of the nature of both a noun and an adjective.
perceivable (adjective), more perceivable, most perceivable
perceivably (adverb), more perceivably, most perceivably
perceive (verb), perceives; perceived; perceiving
1. To become directly aware of something through any of the senses; especially, sight and hearing: Little children perceive the sounds of words that are continuously spoken by their parents and then they learn to understand and to speak them.
2. To achieve an understanding or to apprehend and to notice something; especially, anything that escapes the notice of others: After the corrected English tests were returned to the students in class, Sam perceived a mistake which his teacher had apparently overlooked!
To recognize or to be aware of something by seeing it, hearing it, touching it, smelling it, etc.
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perceiver (s) (noun), perceivers (pl)
Someone who recognizes, discerns, envisions, or understands what is going on and who can make decisions based on his or her recognitions or thinking about something.
percept (s) (noun), percepts (pl)
1. A mental impression of or becoming aware of something and it is considered the basic element in the formation of ideas or actions.
2. Etymology: from Latin praeceptum, from the past participle of praecipere, "to advise, to teach, to instruct, to give rules to" from prae-, pre-, "before" + capere, "to take".
perceptible (adjective), more perceptible, most perceptible
Descriptive of noticing or sensing something, even if it is just slightly.
perceptibly (adverb), more perceptibly, most perceptibly
In a recognizable manner.
perception (s) (noun), perceptions (pl)
Taking in through the senses or the mind, awareness, insight, or intuition: The mother's perception of her son's needs was different from those of the father's ideas.
The ability to be aware something by observing and understanding it.
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perceptive (adjective), more perceptive, most perceptive
percipience (s) (noun), percipiences (pl)
percipient (s) (noun), percipients (pl)
percipient (adjective), more percipient, most percipient
Regarding a person who posses a good understanding of things: Robert’s friend was sharp, alert, and discerning in class and therefore a very percipient student who really impressed his teachers.
Relating to someone who is capable of perceiving or quickly understanding what is going on.
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photo perception (s) (noun), photo perceptions (pl)
The ability to recognize or to know about light.