bio-, bi-, -bia, -bial, -bian, -bion, -biont, -bius, -biosis, -bium, -biotic, -biotical

(Greek: life; living, live, alive)

Don’t confuse this element with another bi- which means "two".

The most important things in life are not things.

—Anonymous
eobiogenesis
The transformation of prebiotic macromolecular systems into the first living organisms (eobionts).
eobionts
1. An organism that lives on the body surface of another without feeding upon its host, as in many mosses and lichens.
2. The earliest known living organisms developed from some prebiotic macromolecular precursors.
epibiont
1. Living attached to another organism.
2. Surviving, applied to endemic species that are relics of a former flora or fauna; growing on the exterior of living organisms; living on a surface, as of the sea bottom.

An antonym is hypobiotic.

epibiontic
Living attached to another organism without any connotation of mutualism.

Urchins and grazing fishes feed on epibionts of reefs and often scrape off bits of calcium carbonate; resulting in bioerosion.

epibiosis
Either the condition of those organisms that live on the surface of another organism or those benthic organisms that live on the surface of bottom mud.
epibiotic
Living attached to another organism; such as, fungus.
eremobiologist
A specialist in the science of desert life.
eremobiology
The study, or science, of desert life.
eremobionic
Living in desert regions.
eremobiontic
Living in desert regions.
ethnobiological
An adjective modifying studies related to ethnobiology.
ethnobiologist
Someone who is a specialist in the study of ethnobiology or the study of ethnic groups as they are affected by the biological factors in their environment.
ethnobiology
1. The biological study of human races.
2. The study of ethnic groups as they are affected by the biological factors in their environment.
3. The study of the way various cultural groups make use of or interact with the animals and plants of their environment.

Pointing to a page about ethnobiology. An ethnobiologist who is working to preserve the skills of native medicine men (shamans) in South America.


ethnobiomedical
A descriptive reference to ethnobiomedicine.
ethnobiomedicine
The use of herbs (medicinal plants) by other cultures to fight various physical ailments; such as, yellow fever, malaria, heart disease, snake bites, mental illness, high-blood pressure, etc.
Quiz If you would like to take a series of self-scoring quizzes over some of the words in this bio- unit, then click this Life, Live, Living Quiz link so you can check your knowledge. You may also try several additional quizzes in this listing.

Related life, live-word units: anima-; -cole; vita-; viva-.