tend-, tendo-, ten-, teno-, tenot-, tenonto-, tens-, tent-, -tend, -tension, -tent, -tense, -tensive, -tentious

(Greek > Latin: to move in a certain direction; to stretch, to hold out; tension; as well as tendon, sinew)

superintend
To act as superintendent of; direct; supervise; manage [to stretch out; to direct; to pay attention to].
superintendence
1. The management by overseeing the performance or operation of a person or group.
2. The act of supervising or managing a situation or people.
superintendency
1. A district or place under a superintendent.
2. The position or work of a superintendent.
superintendent
A person in charge of a department, institution, etc.; a director; a supervisor.
tenability
tenable (adjective), more tenable, most tenable
A reference to that which can be held, defended, or maintained: There are tenable objectives that students, and other users, can achieve if they have access to the resources that will give them the information that they need.
Pertaining to something that can be maintained or defended.
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tenableness
tenacious
Holding firmly; that which holds together strongly; cohesive; tough.
tenacity (noun), tenacities (pl)
The determination to remain firm, physically and mentally; to a decision, a plan, an opinion, or a purpose without doubting that it is the right thing to do: Despite many years of dedication, the lexicographer continues to show his tenacity by working on his special dictionary until it is either completed or as close to being finished as possible before he departs from this world.
A quality of being able to hold on firmly.
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tenancy
Being a tenant; occupation of land, a building, etc. by rental or lease.
tenant
1. A person who pays rent to occupy, to hold, or to use land, a building, etc.
2. To hold as a tenant; to occupy.
tend
1. To be directed; proceed or extend [to stretch, hold out].
2. To have an inclination, tendency, bias, etc. to do something; incline.
tendency (s) (noun), tendencies (pl)
1. An inclination to move or to behave in a particular way: There is a tendency for students in colleges or universities to socialize in the evenings.

There are notable tendencies of financial problems in some countries that are caused by poor economies.

2. Etymology: from Latin tendentia, from tendere, "to stretch, to extend, to aim."
A predisposition to think or act in a certain way.
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tendentious (adjective), more tendentious, most tendentious
1. Characterized by a deliberate tendency or aim; especially, advancing a definite point of view and one that others disagree with: Martin wasn't invited to parties very often because he had a tendentious manner of talking about politics, which got on other people's nerves.
2. Etymology: from Latin tendere, "to stretch out, to distend, to extend."
Referring to the intention of promoting a particular objective.
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Descriptive of wanting to present a special result.
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tender
To offer in payment of an obligation; to present for acceptance; offer of money, services, etc. made to satisfy an obligation, avoid legal actions, etc.

Some related "tension" words are available at this tono- unit.