-ant, -ants

(Latin: a suffix; a person who, the thing which; people who, things which)

repugnant (adjective), more repugnant, most repugnant
1. A reference to something that is offensive and completely unacceptable: The idea of wearing a swimsuit to a formal dinner is an example of repugnant social conduct.
2. Descriptive of something that is very disturbing and can make people feel physically repelled or disgusted: Because the changing room at the gym hadn't been aired out and six P.E. periods had taken place that day, the room had quite a repugnant odor!
3. Relating to being offensive or repulsive by having morally bad actions: Rebecca displayed total repugnant behavior by encouraging other students to drink alcoholic beverages before school in the morning.
4. Etymology: from Latin repugnantem, repugnans and repugnare, "to fight back, to resist"; from re-, "back" + pugnare, "to fight".
Relating to something that is repulsive, distasteful, or offensive.
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Referring to something that is offensive to the taste.
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resistant
resonant
1. Producing a loud, clear, deep sound: "The resonant church bell could be heard several blocks away."
2. Strongly affecting someone; especially, with a particular quality: "Her speech was resonant with meaning and understanding of the situation."
rotundant
salivant
1. Any agent causing a flow of saliva.
2. An agent that increases the flow of saliva.
3. Promoting salivation; sialagogic.
savant (s) (noun), savants (pl)
1. Someone who is a profound or extensive learner; a scholar: A savant is considered to be well-versed in literature or science, and often with an exceptional skill in a specialized field of education.
2. Etymology: from Latin sapere "to be wise"; and savant "a learned man" which is a noun use of the adjective form savant "learned, knowing."
An eminent scholar.
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A 
person who is skilled in literature or science.
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scintillant, scintillous, scintillantly
1. Scintillating; emitting sparks.
2. Having brief brilliant points or flashes of light.
secant
servant
1. Someone who serves another, especially someone employed to do household jobs; such as, cooking, cleaning, and serving meals.
2. Someone in public employ.
sextant
significant
1. Having a special meaning that only some people understand.
2. Having a major or important effect: "She presented a significant idea for the project."
3. Something that is relatively large in amount: "Their contributions were significant to the success of our school."
4. Relating to the occurrence of events or outcomes that are too closely linked statistically to be accomplished merely by accodemt.
somnambulant (adjective), more somnambulant, most somnambulant
A reference to walking, or tending to walk, when one is sleeping: Hector's somnambulant behavior usually occurred after he had been asleep for about two hours.
Descriptive of walking while asleep.
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stagnant (adjective), more stagnant, most stagnant
1. Referring to an indication of inactivity and of dullness and sluggishness: The seaside resort becomes a stagnant area when the tourists leave and go back home.
2. Relating to a body of water or the atmosphere of a confined space that has no current or flow and often has an unpleasant smell as a consequence: A stagnant condition involves the lack of freshness or movement.
3. Etymology: from Latin stagnantem, "not running or forming a pool of standing water", from the verb stagnare, from stagnum, "pool".
Pertaining to being inactive or motionless.
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subtenant
supernatant (adjective) (not comparable)
1. Referring to something which swims above or floats on the surface: The cook skimmed the supernatant fat off the top of the water of the boiled meat.

Oil is a supernatant fluid that moves on the surface of water.

2. A reference to that part of a floating body that is above the top of river or oceanic areas: There are all kinds of supernatant boats that can be suspended on water.
3. Etymology: From Latin supernatare, "to float"; from super-, "above, over" + natare, "to swim".
A reference to something that floats on the surface; such as, water.
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