-ate (to do)

(Latin: a suffix; to do, to make, to cause, or to act upon; to do something with)

chromate
collegiate
compassionate (adjective), more compassionate, most compassionate
1. Conveying a feeling or showing sorrow for the misfortunes of another person; sympathetic, kind-hearted, pitying: After the death of Mr. Smith, a colleague at work, Janet wrote a compassionate letter to his wife reflecting her sorrow at the loss of her husband.
2. Relating to, or characterized by, thoughts of helping others in their sufferings: Many refugees will never forget the compassionate and sympathetic support they received from the volunteers after their hardships of crossing the sea and landing in Europe.
Merciful and sympathetic.
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compensate (verb), compensates; compensated; compensating
1. To make a payment to or to provide something of value to another person in return for work or for a service that has been done: Jack and Mary were compensated for taking care of the neighbor's garden and lawn while the family was away on vacation.
2. To provide something good as a reward for anything else that is bad or undesirable in order to make up for a defect or weakness: The price of the book that Karen bought was reduced because its cover was torn; so, the store was compensating for the damage with a lower price.
3. To counterbalance; to offset; to be equivalent to: Shirley compensated her lack of beauty with great personal charm and intelligence.
4. Etymology: from Latin compensatus, formed from the verb compensare, "to weigh one thing (against another)"; therefore, "to counterbalance"; from com-, "with" + pensare, a form of pendere, "to weigh".
To make up for some kind of loss.
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concentrate (verb), concentrates, concentrated, concentrating
confederate (s) (noun), confederates (pl)
1. Someone who works with another person to achieve something which is sometimes secret or illegal: Greg and his sister both wanted to study chemistry, so they considered themselves confederates because both of them were studying and helping each other to achieve their goals.
2. A group of people, states, or political parties that have united for a particular purpose; especially, a political one: The two countries agreed to join their forces as confederates and to fight against terrorist groups.
3. Etymology: from Latin confoederare, "to unite"; from com-, "with, together" + foederare, "to establish by treaty or league (a collection of people, countries, or groups that combine for a particular purpose)".
A person or accomplice who is working with someone to do something that is mischievous or criminal.
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consulate
The political office or period of office of a consul, or the jurisdiction of a consul.
cyclamate
delicate (DEL i kit) (adjective), more delicate, most delicate
1. Pleasing in its lightness, mildness, subtlety, etc. (a delicate flavor, odor, color, etc.); fine, dainty, exquisite, elegant: The queen wore a long gown of delicate silk.
2. Easily damaged, spoiled, fragile, frail, perishable; dainty: The plate was so delicate that Irene was afraid to wash it.
3. Frail, feeble, debilitated, weakened; infirm, unwell, sickly, ailing: Jim was concerned about his wife's delicate physical condition.
4. Palatable, savory, delicious, appetizing, luscious: The hostess presented a tray of delicate food to her guests.
5. Soft, muted, subdued: Jerry had the walls of his bedroom painted with a delicate blue.
6. Exquisite, minute, detailed: David's friend admired the delicate workmanship on the bronze doors."
7. Tactful, tasteful, diplomatic, careful, sensitive, refined: The salesman handled the customer's complaint in a delicate manner.
desolater, desolator (s) (noun); desolaters, desolators (pl)
Someone who or that which makes desolate.
detoxicate (dee TAHK si kayt") (verb), detoxicates; detoxicated; detoxicating
1. To remove poisonous substances or to transform them into something harmless: Jeff’s nose was bothering him so much because he couldn’t breath properly and so the doctor gave him some special nose drops in order to detoxicate the tissues which were posing his breathing problems.
2. To treat an alcoholic or drug addict by using a controlled withdrawal of the addictive substance: Greg, who drank too much wine and beer, was strongly encouraged by his friends to have himself detoxicated in a special hospital.
disloyally
dispassionate (adjective), more dispassionate, most dispassionate
1. A reference to being free from emotions or bias: The teacher heard both sides of the argument that the two students were having in a dispassionate and reasonable way and she gave her advice for a solution which would satisfy each one.
2. Conveying no influence by strong feeling; especially, not affected by personal or emotional involvements: The surgeon, who was performing the operation, maintained a dispassionate manner even though the patient was his son.
Uninfluenced by emotion or bias, impartial.
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electorate (s) (noun), electorates (pl)
All of the officially qualified voters within a given country or district for a scheduled election: Up until 1920, the women in the United States were not part of the electorate and were therefore not allowed to choose their representatives in the government.
Those who are qualified to vote in an election.
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ethanoate