path-, patho-, -path-, -pathia, -pathic, -pathology, -pathetic, -pathize, -pathy

(Greek: feeling, sensation, perception; suffering, disease, or disorder; a system of treating diseases)

In medicine, some of these elements usually mean "someone who suffers from a disease of, or one who treats a disease"; so, they should not be confused with the words that mean "feeling" which are also shown on these pages even though both meanings come from the same Greek element.

myopathy (s) (noun), myopathies (pl)
Any disease of the muscles or of the muscle tissue: Some of the football players developed myopathy and could not play in the upcoming season.
naprapath (s) (noun), naprapaths (pl)
Someone who uses therapeutic manipulation of joints, ligaments, or muscles: Jack's aunt was a naprapath who applied a treatment based on the theory that morbid symptoms were dependent upon strained or contracted ligaments.
naprapathy (s) (noun) (no pl)
A branch of alternative medicine based on the theory that disease or illness is caused by strained ligaments and other problems of connective tissue and can be treated by massage: Naprapathy is a system of therapeutic manipulation based on the belief that diseases or ailments are dependent upon strained or contracted ligaments in the spine, thorax, or pelvis.
naturopath (s) (noun), naturopaths (pl)
A type of alternative medicine: Naturopath is based on the principle that illnesses can be treated, cured, or prevented without using any drugs or surgery, but by the use of water, herbs, and air, along with therapy using physical means.
naturopathic (adjective) (not comparable)
Relating to a form of treatment using natural means: Clifford's mother believed in naturopathic methods when she felt ill, like drinking only special herbal teas and getting lots of fresh air.
naturopathy (s) (noun), naturopathies (pl)
A drugless system of therapy: Naturopathy makes use of physical forces such as air, light, water, heat, massage, etc. and avoids the use of surgery and some types of medication.
necropathy (s) (noun), necropathies (pl)
A condition or disease process principally characterized by decaying tissue gangrene: Necropathy can occur when there is no longer a supply of blood to that part of the body.
neopathy (s) (noun), neopathies (pl)
A new, or newly, discovered disease: Anita complained about her hand hurting, and since the doctor could not diagnose it, he named it a neopathy, some ailment he had never seen or heard about before!
nephropathia (s) (noun), nephropathias (pl)
In pathology, a diseased or abnormality of the kidneys; nephropathy: There are different kinds of nephropathias and among them are cystinosis, glomerulonephritis, lupus nephritis, and polycystic kidney disease.
nephropathic (adjective) (not comparable)
Concerning a kidney ailment: Dr. Todd informed Jack that he had a nephropathic condition that should be taken seriously, and that he mustn't drink any alcoholic beverages or smoke at all anymore.
nephropathy (s) (noun), nephropathies (pl)
An irregularity or diesease of the kidneys: Susan read that a long subjection or vulnerability to lead can result in nephropathy, or a malfunction of the kidneys.
neuroarthropathy (s) (noun), neuroarthropathies (pl)
Any disease of body parts that are associated with the loss of sensation or feelings in the bone connections: The diagnosis which Dr. Jones presented to the Jim, the ball player, was neuroarthropathy which meant that he would be unable to feel pain in his finger joints if the baseball would hit them.
neuromyopathy (s) (noun), neuromyopathies (pl)
A disorder of a muscle resulting from a disorder of its nerve supply; myoneuropathy: Neuromyopathy may occur as a simultaneous disorder of nerves and muscles or from accumulated toxicity.
neuronopathy (s) (noun), neuronopathies (pl)
A disorder, often toxic, of the neurons: Neuronopathy is a type of polyneuropathy that concerns a number of peripheral nerves that have been damaged.
neuropathic (adjective) (not comparable)
Pertaining to an organic or functional disorder of the nervous system: Mrs. Jackson knew that a neuropathic condition of her fingertips, toes, or even of the retinas could arise because she had diabetes for a long time.

The terms "neurotic" and "psychogenic" are usually preferred by many psychologists instead of neuropathic for functional disorders.


Quiz You can find self-scoring quizzes over many of the words in this subject area by going to this Vocabulary Quizzes page.