philo-, phil-, -phile, -philia, -philic, -philous, -phily, -philiac, -philist, -philism

(Greek: love, loving, friendly to, fondness for, attraction to; strong tendency toward, affinity for)

These are just a few of the meanings set up for the etymological meanings of philo- which comes to us from Greek.

In biology, there are many words that use philo-, phil- to mean "thriving in such and such a place or situation; or exhibiting a tendency for a specified condition" for its existence.

Other meanings include: "strongly attracted to; such as, an organism that loves or is strongly attracted to something which is specified".

In psychology and psychiatry, -phile, -philia, etc. use this element as a word termination indicating an abnormal craving or attraction to or an affinity for an object as shown by the word stems to which they are affixed.

etsenephile
etsenephilist
A collector of etchings.
euhydrophile
euhydrophilous
euhydrophily
Thriving submerged in fresh water.
euphile
euphilous
euphily
In biology, a reference to a plant or flower that has morphological adaptations for attracting and guiding a specialized pollinator.
eurithermophilous
In biology, capable of living in a wide range of temperatures.
eurotophile
eurotophilous
In biology, thriving in or on leaf mold.
eurotophily
eurythermophile
Tolerant of (even a fondness for) a wide range of relatively high temperatures.
eurythermophilic
A descriptive reference to organisms which can tolerate a wide range of relatively high temperatures.
extranophile
Quiz button #1 You may take a self-scoring quiz over some of the words in this section by just clicking this Philo Quiz #1 link.

Related "love, fondness" units: agape-; amat-; vener-; venus.