philo-, phil-, -phile, -philia, -philic, -philous, -phily, -philiac, -philist, -philism

(Greek: love, loving, friendly to, fondness for, attraction to; strong tendency toward, affinity for)

These are just a few of the meanings set up for the etymological meanings of philo- which comes to us from Greek.

In biology, there are many words that use philo-, phil- to mean "thriving in such and such a place or situation; or exhibiting a tendency for a specified condition" for its existence.

Other meanings include: "strongly attracted to; such as, an organism that loves or is strongly attracted to something which is specified".

In psychology and psychiatry, -phile, -philia, etc. use this element as a word termination indicating an abnormal craving or attraction to or an affinity for an object as shown by the word stems to which they are affixed.

coprophilous
1. Living in, thriving on, or growing on excrement or dung.
2. Growing upon fecal matter; said of certain bacteria.
coprophily
1. An attraction to filth or feces.
2. In biology, feeding on dung or fecal material; an organism that ingests fecal material from other organisms.
3. Organisms that inhabit dung.
coryphile
coryphilous
In biology, thriving in alpine meadows.
coryphily
coryphophile
coryphophilous
In biology, dwelling and thriving in high mountains.
coryphophily
cottapensophile
A collector of coat hangers.
cottapensophilist
cremnophile
cremnophilous
Pertaining to the dwelling and thriving on cliffs.
cremnophily
crenophile (s) (noun), crenophiles (pl)
In biology, creatures that are living or thriving in or near a spring.
crenophilous
Quiz button #1 You may take a self-scoring quiz over some of the words in this section by just clicking this Philo Quiz #1 link.

Related "love, fondness" units: agape-; amat-; vener-; venus.