valid-, val-, vale-, -vail, -valent, -valence

(Latin: valere, to be strong, to be well, to be worth; strong; power, strength; and "fare well" [go with strength])

valedictor (s) (noun), valedictors (pl)
Someone who delivers farewell words or a speech on a special occasion: "A valedictor is a student who gives the closing address at a graduation ceremony of an educational institution, usually the one with the highest grade average in the graduating class."

valedictorian (s) (noun), valedictorians (pl)
In colleges, schools, academies, etc., the student (male or female) appointed on the basis of merit to deliver the special oration on commencement day as part of the graduation ceremonies: "In an unusual turn of events, the university president appointed two valedictorians to speak at the end of the academic year because both of them had outstanding qualifications and achievements."
valedictory (adjective) (not comparable)
A reference to an oral presentation when making a farewell or when going away: The president of the company gave a moving valedictory speech at her retirement luncheon.
valedictory (s) (noun), valedictories (pl)
A farewell oration or speech; especially, one that is made at a graduation ceremony.
valence, valency
In chemistry, the capacity of an atom or group of atoms to combine in specific proportions with other atoms or groups of atoms.
valentine
Valentinian
Valete. (wah LAY teh) (pl)
Farewell; Goodbye.

Used when addressing two or more people.

valetudinarian
A weak or sickly individual, especially one constantly and morbidly concerned with matters of health.
valetudinary
Of, pertaining to, or typical of a valetudinarian.
valiant
1. Having or exhibiting valor; courageous.
2. Characterized by or performed with valor.
valid (adjective), more valid, most valid
1. Well-grounded or justifiable: The terrible weather gave many students a valid reason for not being able to attend school.
2. Legally sound and effective; incontestable: Mary's passport is still valid for one more year; so, she can travel to Europe next month as planned.
3. Etymology: from Latin validus, "strong, powerful, active"; from valere, "to be strong".
A justified reason based on truth or fact.
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validate
1. To declare or make legally valid.
2. To mark with an indication of official sanction.
validation
validity