em-, emp-, empt-; sump-, -sum-

(Latin: a taking, to take, to take up, to buy, to select; to use, to spend, to consume)

exempt (verb), exempts; exempted; exempting
To free a person or an organization from an obligation, a responsibility, or a liability that is imposed on or required by others to do: "The church is exempted from paying taxes on the place of worship."

"For psychological reasons, the military is exempting the soldier from being reassigned to the war zone."

exempt (adjective), more exempt, most exempt
A reference to being free from a liability or an obligation which is imposed on others: The patients in this room are exempt from any charges because they suffered from a virus that was caused by unsanitary conditions here.

The editorial writer is not exempt from criticism for what he wrote about the mayor.

Not subject to nor bound by the rules that apply to other people.
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Exempta juvat spiris e pluribus unus.
Better one thorn plucked than all remain.
exemption
impromptu (adjective) (no comparables)
Relating to something that is done without any previous preparations, rehearsals or planning: Karen's guest, Tom, delivered an impromptu speech at her birthday party.
Descriptive of a statement that is made offhand.
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In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni.
We enter the circle after dark and are consumed by fire.

A Latin palindrome that describes the movement of moths.

inconsumptible
Incapable of being consumed.
irredeemable
macroconsumer
Any large organism that ingests smaller organisms.
mali exempli (Latin statement)
Translation: "Of bad example; of bad precedent."

Smoking while standing under a NO SMOKING sign, is a mali exempli behavior!

Non assumpsit.
He has not undertaken.

The legal term for a plea denying a promise or undertaking.

peremptorily (adverb), more peremptorily, most peremptorily
peremptory (adjective), more peremptory, most peremptory
1. A reference to the insistence on immediate attention or obedience; especially, in a brusquely imperious way: When someone says something in a peremptory manner, he or she wants people to stop what they're doing and respond to what has been dictated.
2. Used to describe an order, a command, etc. which one must obey without any questions, hesitations, or excuses: When a superior officer in the military gives a lower ranking person a peremptory instruction to do something, that soldier, sailor, marine, etc. must do it promptly without any stalling or delay.
3. Etymology: from Latin peremptorius, "decisive, final" from per, "away entirely" + emere, "to take" + -ory, "compulsory, mandatory".
A command that is dictatorial and must be obeyed immediately.
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preempt, pre-empt (verb); preempts, pre-empts; preempted, pre-empted; preempting, pre-empting
1. To supersede or to take the place of someone or something: The current state law was preempted by a federal law.
2. To take some action that makes the plans of others become irrelevant or insignificant: The U.S. President's speech will be preempting, or replacing, the regular TV program while it is being delivered.
To take something away or to replace another person.
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preempted (adjective), more preempted, most preempted
Pertaining to someone, or something, that has been replaced for another person or action: "The preempted TV programs resulted from the repetitions of the 'breaking news' throughout the day."