sub-, suc-, suf-, sug-, sum-, sup-, sur-, sus-, su-

(Latin: under, below, beneath; used as a prefix as shown in various formats below)

Don't confuse the sur- in this element with the sur- in super-. Note: sub- regularly means "under", but it often changes its form as it retains or keeps its meaning:

The prefix sub- often becomes suc- before c: succumb.

The prefix sub- often becomes suf- before f: suffuse.

The prefix sub- often becomes sug- before g: suggest.

The prefix sub- often becomes sum- before m: sumptuous.

The prefix sub- often becomes sup- before p: suppression.

The prefix sub- often becomes sur- before r: surrogate.

The prefix, sub- is often simplified to su- before sp; as seen in suspect, suspend, suspicion, suspension, et al. Before c, p, and t; it is sometimes formed into sus-.

subsidize (verb), subsidizes; subsidized; subsidizing
1. To contribute money to somebody or something, especially to give a government grant to a private company, an organization, or a charity to help it to continue to be active: The bill before the government was to end the policy which was subsidizing political parties with the use of tax payers' money.
2. To pay for a part of something or to reduce the cost of something by funding it with money: Because she was only working part time, Trudy was grateful that the city was subsidizing her rent for the first three months.
To support with a monetary contribution or to aid and to promote; such as, a private enterprise with public money.
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subsidy (s) (noun), subsidies (pl)
1. A grant or gift of money from a government to a private company, organization, or charity to help it to continue functioning.
2. To help with expenses; a monetary gift or a contribution to somebody or something; especially, to pay expenses.
3. A sum of financial aids that are paid, often in accordance with a treaty, by one government to another one in order to have some service in return.
5. Etymology: From Old French subside, "help, aid, contribution"; from Latin subsidium, "help, aid, assistance, (military) reinforcements"; from sub, "behind, near" + sedere, "to sit".
subsist
subsistence
subsistent
subsoil
1. The layer of soil between the topsoil and bedrock.
2. The compacted soil beneath the topsoil.
subsonic
substance (s) (noun), substances, (pl)
1. A particular kind of matter that consists of uniform properties: The plumber used a pipe that was coated with an oily substance.
2. The physical matter of which something is made: The food that anyone eats is a substance which is tangible or can be touched.
3. Wealth, possessions, and property: Wolfgang has become a man of substance since he started his computer business.
Something that is solid or real; material possessions or wealth.
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In addition to the following locations, this word entry has a link to this index: Word a Day Revisited Index of Cartoons Illustrating the Meanings of Words (page 36)
substandard
substantial
substantiate (verb), substantiates; substantiated; substantiating
1. To verify or to prove something by supplying evidence or facts: The officer asked the witness if she had the facts to substantiate the information she was providing about the bank robbery.
2. To make real or actual by providing evidence which proves that something actually exists: The research that the agronomists (soil scientists) did on their trip to the desert will substantiate the theories they were proposing about water conservation and plant growth.
To support with proof or evidence.
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To establish with competent evidence.
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substantiation
substellar
substitute
substitution