semeio-, sema-, semato-, semat-, semasio-, semio-, -semic, -semia

(Greek: signal, signals; sign, signs; mark, marks; symbol, symbols)

semiosis, semeiosis
1. In linguistics, the process of the significance of language or literature.
2. The mental or symbolic process in which something; such as, a word, a symbol, or a nonverbal cue functions as a sign for the related content; including, the production of meanings.
semiotic, semeiotic
1. Concerning signs and symbols; especially, in language.
2. Relating to signs and symbols; for example, spoken or written signs.
semiotician, semeiotician
Someone who studies all forms of human communicative behavior; especially, of signs and symbols and their meanings.
semiotics, semeiotics
1. The theory and study of signs and symbols, what they mean, and how they are used; especially, as elements of language or other systems of communication, and comprising semantics, syntactics, and pragmatics.
2. The study of signs and symbols of all kinds, what they mean, and how they relate to the things or ideas they refer to.

With reference to culture, the meaning of a sign or symbol is not permanent an it varies over time, in different contexts, and by the intent of the speaker or writer.

The relationship between a symbol or sign and what it represents can also be challenged by different individuals or groups of individuals who might have different views on the content of a specific sign or signified relationship; such as, with the word "culture".

3. In medicine, the study of symptoms of diseases and identifying the ways that various symptoms indicate the diseases that underlie them.

"Modern semiotics has produced so many new insights and viewpoints that symbol research is being placed on an increasingly secure foundation."

"In our age of inundation by optical stimuli, there is a great danger that man's own capacity for pictorial thought will continue to languish. Working with symbols can help us find means and ways to see behind things and to tie together visual and verbal manifestations of a world so wonderfully varied and multi-layered."

—Udo Becker, editor of the book, The Continuum of Encyclopedia of Symbols;
The Continuum Publishing Company; New York; 1992; page 6.
zoosemiotics
1. The study of animal communication.
2. The study of the methods by which animals use signaling as a form of communication.