scopo-, scop-, scept-, skept-, -scope-, -scopy, -scopia, -scopic, -scopist

(Greek > Latin: see, view, sight, look, look at, examine, behold, consider)

spectroscopic ellipsometry
1. A spectroscopic ellipsometer allows for the accurate characterization of a range of properties including the layer thickness, optical constants, composition, crystallinity anisotropy, and uniformity.
2. Ellipsometry which uses more than one wavelength and allows variation of an angle of incidence; measures not only film thickness, but also provides information on select chemical/physical characteristics of the film(s); very useful in process monitoring and diagnostic.
3. Ellipsometry which uses more than one wavelength and allows variation of an angle of incidence; measures not only film thickness, but also provides information on select chemical/physical characteristics of the film(s); very useful in process monitoring and diagnostic.

Ellipsometry is the most common way of measuring thickness of thin films; based on the detection of phase shift of plane polarized incident light beam during reflection from the surface.

Thickness determines ranging from a few angstroms to tens of microns are possible for single layers and complex multilayer stacks.

sphincteroscope
A speculum to facilitate inspection of the internal sphincter ani muscle.
sphincteroscopy
The visual examination of a sphincter or a ringlike band of muscle fibers that constricts a passage or closes a natural orifice, also called musculus sphincter.
sphygmocardioscope (s) (noun), sphygmocardioscopes (pl)
A polygraph (multiple) recording of both the heartbeat and the radial pulse; such as, on the wrist.
sphygmoscope (s) (noun), sphygmoscopes (pl)
1. An instrument for measuring and recording various characteristics of the arterial pulse beat.
2. A device which, when applied over an artery, indicates graphically the movements or character of the pulse.
sphygmoscopy (s) (noun), sphygmoscopies (pl)
Examination of the pulse beat.
splanchnoscopy
Examination of the abdominal viscera, either by endoscopy or by transillumination after the introduction of a light source into the viscera.
stalagmoscope
1. An instrument for viewing drops.
2. An instrument for determining exactly the number of drops in a given quantity of liquid, used as a measure of the surface tension of a fluid.
statoscope
1. A barometer that records small variations in atmospheric pressure.
2. A barometer for measuring or recording very small variations in atmospheric pressure, often used as an instrument for indicating changes in the altitude of an aircraft.
stauroscope
An optical instrument used in determining the position of the planes of light-vibration in sections of crystals.
stauroscopic, stauroscopically
A reference to an optical instrument that is used in determining the position of the planes of light-vibrations in sections of crystals.
stereomicroscope
1. A microscope with two optically separate eyepieces to make viewed objects look three-dimensional.
2. A microscope (simple or compound) for each eye (binocular), giving different aspects and, therefore, a stereoscopic effect.

There are two kinds of compound stereomicroscopes: binobjective and common main objective.

stereomonoscope
An instrument with two lenses, so an image of a single picture projected on a screen of ground glass is made to present an appearance of relief, and may be viewed by several people at the same time.
stereoscope
An instrument through which pictures of the same object, taken from different angles, are seen through separate eyepieces to produce the illusion of a single image having three dimensions.
stereoscopic
1. Involving, producing, or resembling the effects of seeing something as three-dimensional.
2. A reference to a three-dimensional vision or any of various processes and devices for giving the illusion of depth from two-dimensional images or reproductions; such as, of a photograph or motion picture that has depth, as well as height and width.

Stereopsis, or stereoscopic vision, is believed to have an origin in the anatomic and physiological structures of the retinas of the eyes and the visual cortex.

It is present in normal binocular vision because the eyes view objects in space from two points, so that the retinal image patterns of the same object points in space are slightly different in each of the eyes.

Cross references of word families that are related directly, or indirectly, to: "appear, visible, visual, manifest, show, see, reveal, look": blep-; delo-; demonstra-; opt-; -orama; pare-; phanero-; phant-; pheno-; spec-; vela-, veal-; video-, visuo-.