rupt-, -rupting, -ruption

(Latin: break, tear, rend; burst)

myringorupture (s), myringoruptures (pl) (nouns)
A rarely used term for "rupture of the tympanic membrane (eardrum)".
rote (s) (noun)
1. A mechanical or habitual repetition of something to be learned: "Jake memorized his speech by rote so he could make eye-contact with his audience and not have to look down at his notes."
2. Etymology: from Middle English, "practice, custom, routine"; from Old French rote (French route), "road, way, path"; from Vulgar Latin (via) rupta; literally "a broken way", feminine past participle of rumpere, "to break".
—Dr. Ernest Klein,
A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the English Language,
Elsevier Publishing Company, New York, 1966.
rout (s), routs (pl) (nouns)
1. Mob, rabble.
2. A complete defeat of an opponent in a battle, competition, or election.
3. Etymology: from Middle French route, "host, troop, crowd"; from Old French rote, from Vulgar Latin rupta, "a dispersed group"; literally, "a broken group", from Latin rumpere, "to break".
—Dr. Ernest Klein,
A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the English Language,
Elsevier Publishing Company, New York, 1966.
rout, routs; routed; routing (verbs)
To put to flight, the original meaning of the verb rout was "to break the ranks of a troop".
route (s), routes (pl) (nouns)
1. A course, a road, or a way that is taken in order to get from a starting point to a destination: "The most direct route to work is via the express way."

"Although John and his family knew that the express way was the shortest route, they decided to take the more scenic route."

2. Etymology: from Middle English, from Old French route, "road, way, path"; from Vulgar Latin rupta (via) from rumpere, "to break".
—Dr. Ernest Klein,
A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the English Language,
Elsevier Publishing Company, New York, 1966.
route, routes; routed; routing (verbs)
routine (adjective)
routine (s), routines (pl) (nouns)
Etymology: French, from Middle French route, "road, way, path".
—Dr. Ernest Klein,
A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the English Language,
Elsevier Publishing Company, New York, 1966.
routine, routines; routined; routining (verbs)
A regular or unvarying procedure: "The children took advantage of the fact that the substitute teacher was not familiar with the class routines and so they were late in doing their assignments."
routinely (adverb)
routing code (s), routing codes (pl) (nouns)
routinism (s) (noun)
routinist (adjective)
routinist (s) (noun)
routinization (s), routinizations (pl) (nouns)

Related break, broken-word units: clast-; frag-.