archaeo-, archeo-, archae-, arche-, archa-, archi-, -arch

(Greek: original [first in time], beginning, first cause, origin, ancient, primitive, from the beginning; most basic)

quantitative archaeology, quantitative archeology
Archaeological techniques dependent on counting, measuring, and the use of statistical methods and computers.
rescue archaeology, rescue archeology
The branch of archaeology devoted to studying artifacts and features on sites which are imminently threatened by development in the form of the construction of dams, buildings, highways, etc.

Threats to archaeological remains occur in the form of road-building, road improvement, new building of houses, offices, and industrial complexes, the flooding of valleys for reservoirs, and improved farming techniques involving the use of deep plowing.

The rescue, or salvage, archaeologist, is concerned with the retrieval of as much information as possible about the archaeological sites before they are damaged or destroyed. Frequently time is too short and funds are too limited for anything but a brief survey.

salvage archaeology, salvage archeology (s) (noun) (no plural)
A branch of ancient times that are devoted to studying artifacts and features on sites which are in danger of being damaged, or destroyed, by development in the form of the construction of dams, buildings, highways, etc.: "Salvage archaeology includes the location, recording (usually through excavation), and collection of archaeological data from a site in advance of highway construction, drainage projects, or urban development."

In the U.S., the first major program of salvage archaeology was undertaken during 1930, ahead of the construction and dam building done by the Tennessee Valley authority."

The rescue, or salvage, archaeologist, is concerned with the retrieval of as much information as possible about the archaeological sites before they are damaged or destroyed.

xenoarchaeology, xenoarcheology
A proto-science that exists so far mainly in science fiction works, especially those that have to do with space exploration, such as Star Trek.

It is primarily concerned with the physical remains of alien cultures which might be found on planets which have been inhabited or visited by extraterrestrials.

xerarch
1. Originating in a dry habitat; such as, a rocky shore, cliff, or desert.
2. Developing in dry places; said of plant succession (development of a plant community from its initial stage to its final stage).
zooarchaeology, zooarcheology (s) (noun); zooarchaeologies, zooarcheologies (pl)
The study of animal remains from archaeological sites: "Zooarchaeology includes the identification and analysis of animal species as an aid to reconstructing human diets, determining the impact of animals on past economies, and in understanding the environment at the time."

"Zooarchaeologists attempt to answer questions such as how many species of domesticated animals there were, how far wild animals were exploited, how many very young animals there were to determine kill patterns and climate changes, in what way bones were butchered, what the sex ratios there were in determining breeding strategies, and if there were any animals of unusual size."

Related "time" units: aevum, evum; Calendars; chrono-; horo-; pre-; Quotes: Time; tempo-.