prop-, proach-, proximo-, proxim-

(Latin: nearest, near; close, closest)

irreproachably (adverb), more irreproachably, most irreproachably
palatoproximal
A reference to the palatal (lingual) and proximal surface of a maxillary tooth.
propinquity (s) (noun), propinquities (pl)
1. A nearness in place or time, or a sense of being in the vicinity or area of something, or a physical or psychological closeness of one person to another one: Neighbors, office personnel, travelers sitting next to each other on an airplane, or people riding together in an elevator are all affected by social propinquity.
2. Etymology: from Latin propinquitatem, from propinquus, "nearness, neighboring, area" from prope, "near by."
Nearness in time or place.
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Being next to someplace that is advantageous.
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proximal
proximally
proximate
proximately
proximateness
proximity
proximoataxia
Ataxia which involves the movements of the proximal (nearest) parts of a limb or limbs.
proximoceptor
reproach (s) (noun), reproaches (pl)
1. An expression of disapproval or disappointment: Accusations and reproaches from the two politicians made it almost impossible to continue their presentations on TV.
2. A strong rebuke or criticism by someone about something others have done: The workers feared what their supervisor's strong reproaches would be for the mistakes they made while constructing the apartment building.
3. Etymology: from Latin repropiare, "to blame, to bring up against"; from re-, "opposite" + prope, "near."
A censure or rebuke.
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reproach (verb), reproaches; reproached; reproaching
1. To speak in an angry and critical way: The editor of the newspaper was reproaching his reporter for writing so many negative things about the mayor of their city.
2. To express disapproval or disappointment to someone or a group: The baseball coach reproached his team for not utilizing their training during the competition with the opposing players.
3. Etymology: from Latin repropiare, "to blame, to bring up against"; from re-, "opposite" + prope, "near."
To rebuke or to censure.
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To criticize strongly.
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reproachable
reproachableness