pre-, prae-

(Latin: before [both in time and place])

The prefix prae- can actually be substituted for pre- because both of them are different spellings for the same prefix meaning "before".

presumptuous (adjective), more presumptuous, most presumptuous
1. Characterized by being unduly confident or bold in opinion or conduct in a way that is arrogant, impertinent, or rude: Mac was giving presumptuous advice to his supervisor about how the project should be done.
2. Relating to doing something without permission or which is not proper, or done for a good reason: The student's presumptuous interruptions by asking the teacher questions before she was able to finish explaining the exercise was more disruptive than helping to understand it.
3. Etymology: from Latin praesumptuosus and praesumere, "to take beforehand, presuppose"; from prae-, "before (in time and place) + sumere, "to take"; which is a compound of sub, "under" + emere, "to take".
Overly bold and taking unacceptable liberties.
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Being boldly rude and interruptive.
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Descriptive of anyone who exceeds a rational or acceptable behavior.
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presumptuously (adverb), more presumptuously, most presumptuously
Relating to going beyond what is right or proper; excessively forward and confident or bold in opinion or conduct in a way that is arrogant, impertinent, or rude: Sam was presumptuously advising his supervisor about how to complete the new contract.
presumptuousness
The quality of being presumptuous; groundless self-confidence; over-bold forwardness.
presystole
The interval just preceding cardiac systole which is the normal rhythmical contraction of the heart, during which the blood in the chambers is forced onward.
presystolic
Immediately preceding that part of diastole, the phase of the cardiac cycle in which the heart relaxes between contractions; specifically, the period when the two ventricles are dilated by the blood flowing into them.
pretemporal (adjective) (not comparable)
1. Characteristic of time before it began; antemundane: Scientists can only speculate about when the appearance of organisms started to exist in the pretemporal period.
2. Etymology: from Latin pre, "before" + temporalis, "period of time, season".
pretence
Primarily a UK spelling of "pretense".
pretend
1. To claim; profess; allege [to stretch forth or to move in a certain direction].
2. To claim or profess falsely; feign;.
3. To make believe, as in play or in an attempt to deceive; feign.
pretension (pri TEN shuhn) (s) (noun), pretensions (pl)
1. A claim, especially an unsupported one, as to some distinction or accomplishment: Greg said he came from a wealthy family, but this pretension turned out not to be true because his family was actually poor and he was deep in debt.
2. A pseudo claim or profession: Sally’s pretension about being the most famous pianist in the whole world was just one of the dreams she had.
pretentious (adjective), more pretentious, most pretentious
1. Descriptive of a person who claims a position of distinction or merit, even when it is not justified: Don is a pretentious salesman who claims to be the greatest contributor to his company's profitable existence.
2. Relating to the unpleasant quality of a person who wants to be regarded as more impressive, successful, or more important than they really are: By using pretentious language, Jack expressed how easy the test in the chemistry class was even though he did not have the highest grade after it was corrected by his teacher.
3. Etymology: from Latin pretentionem, "pretension"; from praetendere, "to pretend" from French prétentieux, "pretension."
Pertaining to being a pompous executive.
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A reference to being a pretentious public servant.
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Conveying importance to being a pretentious guest.
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preterit, preterite
1. A term in grammar for a verb tense expressing something that happened or was done in the past.
2. Etymology: from the 14th century, via Old French preterit from Latin praeteritum as in tempus praeteritum, "time past, time gone by" or "past time".

From the past participle of praeterire, "to pass over something"; from the late 16th century; Late Latin praeterition, "a passing by"; from Latin praeterire "to go by"; from prae-, "before" + itum, the past participle of ire, "to go".

pretermission
The act or an instance of pretermitting; omission.
pretermit (verb), pretermits; pretermitted; pretermitting
1. To leave undone or to neglect: Jerome pretermitted his homework and so he was not prepared for the quiz in his mathematics class when he went to school in the morning.
2. To suspend or to break off: Tom's television was pretermitted as a result of the severe storm that took place in the evening.
3. To deliberately ignore or to pass unnoticed: Lina was pretermitting her sister when she was wearing a new dress as she was about to go on a date with her boyfriend.
4. Etymology: from Latin praetermittere, from praeter, "beyond" from prae-, "before" + mittere, "to let go".
To fail to include or to omit.
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preternatural (adjective), more preternatural, most preternatural
1. Descriptive of something that is beyond what is normal, usual, or ordinary: Pamela was having preternatural dreams that made her wake up and have difficulty going back to sleep.
2. Etymology: from Latin praeternaturalis, "beyond nature" from prae-, "before" + naturam "nature, natural"
A reference to being out of the ordinary because it is supernatural.
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Pertaining to something that is strange and unnatural.
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preternaturally

Related before-word units: ante-; antero-; anti-; pro-.

Related "time" units: aevum, evum; archaeo-, archeo-; Calendars; chrono-; horo-; Quotes: Time; tempo-.