part-, parti-

(Latin: part, parts, to divide)

impartial
impartiality
impartially
jeopard
jeopardize (verb), jeopardizes; jeopardized; jeopardizing
To threaten, to endanger, or to hazard: Eileen's health has been jeopardized because of poor nutrition, drinking, and smoking.
To <I>jeopardize</I> by risking a loss or by having an injury.
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jeopardy (s) (noun), jeopardies (pl)
1. A hazard, a risk of sever injury, or an exposure to loss, to harm, or to death: One's health is in jeopardy when smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, and consuming drugs.
2. A source of danger or a possibility of incurring misfortune: Jack was in jeopardy because of the precariousness of hiking alone in the mountains with the wrong shoes and nothing to drink.
An exposure to injury or peril.
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parcel
pars (s), partes (pl)
A part or a portion of a larger structure.
parse
1. In grammar, to divide a sentence, etc. into grammatical parts and to identify those parts and their relations to each other or to state the parts of speech in a sentence.
2. To study or to analyze something by looking at its parts closely: "The reporters tried to parse the economic data to see why the market was going down."
3. to analyze computer input in a specific language against the formal grammar of that language, both to validate the input and to create an internal representation of it for use in subsequent processing.
part
1. A portion, division, piece, or segment of a whole.
2. Any of several equal portions or fractions that can constitute a whole or into which a whole can be divided.
3. Etymology: from part a "division of a whole, a portion"; borrowed from Old French part, from Latin pars, partis, "part".
partakable
partake
partaker
partes aequales; part. aeq.
Equal parts or in equal parts.
partial (adjective), more partial, most partial
1. Relating to being incomplete: Adam's recent dramatic production is considered to be only a partial success by the critics.
2. A reference to favoritism, where one side is more preferred than another side in an unfair way; biased: Referees must not have partial judgements for either of the competing teams when they contend with each other in sports.
3. Etymology: from Latin partialis, "divisible, solitary"; from pars "part" + -al, "similar to, related to".
Descriptive of favoring one side over another one.
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