-ous, -ious, -eous

(Latin: full of or having the qualities of; in chemistry, a suffix denoting that the element indicated by the name bearing it, has a valence lower than that denoted by the termination -ic; as, nitrous, sulphurous, etc., as contrasted with nitric, sulphuric, etc.)

Only a small number of the hundreds of examples are presented because there are just too many to include at this time.

unctuous (adjective), more unctuous, most unctuous
1. A reference to something which is greasy or oily: The salad dressing seemed to be very unctuous and too creamy, and was not tasty at all!
2. Relating to an individual who is suave or insincerely fervid: The oily nature of ointments may have led to the application of unctuous to describe things marked by an artificial gloss of sentimentality.

Unctuous people or behavior indicates too much praise, interest, friendliness, etc., in a way that is false or unpleasant.

3. Etymology: from Latin unguere, ungere, "to anoint."
Referring to being insincerely gushing or persuasive.
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Relating to an insincere compliment.
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ungracious (adjective), more ungracious, most ungracious
usurious (adjective), more usurious, most usurious
A reference to loan sharks who charge illegal or excessive amounts of money to customers: Henry's cousin was a usurious moneylender in the neighborhood who made sure that he got twice the amount of money back that was borrowed from him.

There was a business in a certain part of town that charged large usurious rates of interest even for very small loans.

Charging illegal or exorbitant interest for the use of money that is loaned.
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Relating to illegal or exorbitant charges for those who borrow money from a loaner.
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uxorious (adjective), more uxorious, most uxorious
Excessively submissive to or devotedly attached to one's wife; especially, in a submissive and obedient way: Mark's wife had him "jumping through a hoop" which indicated that she had complete uxorious control over him.

Camille had a uxorious husband who obeyed her every wish or request to do something.

Husband is on his back on a street so his wife can walk on his body to avoid getting her feet wet.
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Wife has her husband serving the meals.
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Wife has her husband doing the housework.
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vacuous (adjective), more vacuous, most vacuous
1. A reference to something which is devoid of matter and is empty or void: The rooms in the old building were all vacuous and lacking any sign of life for years, except for some cobwebs!
2. Relating to the lack of intelligence; stupid: A vacuous remark is one that is empty of any real knowledge.
3. Descriptive of anything that has no real meaning: The smile that James had on his face was totally vacuous and fake, without any hint of feeling or understanding.
4. Etymology: from Latin vacuus, "empty, vacant."
Expressionless and devoid of contents.
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Statements that are lacking any sense.
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Daydreaming while at work and not thinking about his job.

Mentally lacking any sense.
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vaporous (adjective), more vaporous, most vaporous
1. Consisting of, referring to, or producing moisture in the air: There was a thick vaporous fog covering the valley which made driving difficult.
2. Lacking material existence or permanence: The ghost that appeared to Martin on Halloween, which is a celebration of mystery, ghosts, etc., had a green and vaporous appearance as it floated across the parking lot.
3. Of a fanciful, a ridiculous, or an implausible nature: Helen's vaporous personality was charming most of the time; however, sometimes it was difficult for her husband to determine when she was really being serious.
Full of vapor; that is, foggy, misty, unsubstantial, and fanciful.
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various (adjective), more various, most various
venomous
1. Poisonous.
2. Pertaining to animals or insects that have venom-secreting glands.
3. Secreting venom; poisonous.
4. Malicious; full of malice, spite, or extreme hostility.
venous
veracious (adjective), more veracious, most veracious
1. Relating to someone who is truthful and honest: Toby was known to be most veracious and gave an exact account of how the accident happened.
2. A reference to something which is accurate and precise; as, in an account or story: The veracious statement June told the judge was proven to be totally accurate.
3. Etymology: from Latin verus, "true" + -ous, "having, full of."
Characteristic of meaning what is stated.
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Referring to saying what is really meant.
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Descriptive of being truthful.
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vicious (adjective), more vicious, most vicious
1. Ferocious and violent; carried out with intense violence and an apparent desire to inflict serious harm, or acting in an aggressive, cruel, and violent way: Roy's cousin had a vicious temper and would attempt to yell at anyone who taunted or bothered him.
2. Dangerous and aggressive and liable to attack or bite: Dina's vicious dog was kept on a strong leash whenever he was taken out for a walk.
3. Conveying maliciousness and intended to cause someone mental anguish or to defame that person: Gossips often have very vicious tongues and take pleasure in causing discomfort among their victims.
4. Pertaining to extremely severe or powerful and damaging results: The effect of the vicious hurricane was reported widely in the press which used graphic photographs.
5. Involving a chain of cause and effect or action and reaction in which things get progressively worse: After her fall on the concrete steps, Allison felt as if she were caught in a vicious cycle of appointments; first the doctor; followed by the therapist, then the home nurse, etc.
6. Wicked and immoral; such as, displaying or given to immoral behavior: Hanging out with street gangs was a vicious behavior that often got Lawrence into trouble.
7. Etymology: from Anglo-French vicious, Old French vicieus, from Latin vitiosus, "faulty, defective, corrupt" from Latin vitium, "fault".
victorious
1. Having won.
2. Experiencing triumph.
vigorous (adjective), more vigorous, most vigororous
Descriptive of being healthy, strong, and full of energy: "Shirley's vigorous grandmother is still physically and mentally active despite the fact that she is ninety years old."
vociferous (adjective), more vociferous, most vociferous
1. Pertaining to noisy and loud shouting: When the salesclerk at the department store refused to give the vociferous customer a refund for a defected watch, the manager settled the conflict by replacing it with a new one.

The citizens have been making vociferous demands that something be done to speed up the repair of the damaged bridge that connects two cities across the river from each other.

2. A special reference to a speech which is uproarious and rowdy: The mayor's vociferous opposition to increasing taxes during his debate on TV has resulted in his being re-elected for another term in office.
Descriptive of making a loud outcry.
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Characteristic of being very noisy.
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Relating to making a loud and vociferous opposition to an action.
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voluminous (adjective), more voluminous, most voluminous
1. A reference to clothing that is very loose or full and having a lot of fabric: Sam's friend was wearing a voluminous dress at the party.
2. Relating to written communication which is very lengthy and detailed: The reporters were scribbling down voluminous notes during the conference with the politician.
3. Etymology: from Latin volumen, "roll of writing as a manuscript"; from volvere, "to roll, to turn around".
Pertaining to being great in quantity or size.
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