omni-, omn-

(Latin: all, every)

Justitia Omnibus.
Justice to all.

Motto of Washington, District of Columbia, U.S.A. Also written in Latin as: Justicia omnibus.

Labor omnia vincit.
Perseverance [Work] overcomes all difficulties.

Motto of Centenary College of Louisiana, Shreveport, Louisiana, USA; and the State of Oklahoma, USA.

The phrase/motto is a shortened form of Virgil's statement in his Georgics: Labor omnia vicit improbus, "Never-ending work conquered all things."

It is said that Virgil was describing the harshness of life following the Golden Age, when the earth had yielded its fruits without labor. Jupiter then decided to change everything, making life hard so mankind would learn and become independent.

Nemo mortalium omnibus horis sapit.
No mortal is wise at all times.
Non nobis sed omnibus.
Not for ourselves but for everyone [all mankind].
Non omnia possumus omnes.
We cannot all do everything.

Virgil, in the Aeneid, gives us this way to acknowledge a fact of life: No one can reasonably be expected to become expert in all things.

Omnia aliena sunt tempus tantum nostrum est.
Nothing is ours except time.
Omnia Omnibus Ubique.
All Things for All People Everywhere.

Motto of Harrods's Department Store (of London).

Omnia vincit amor.
Love conquers everything.
omniactive
omniarch
A ruler of all things.
omnibearing
omnibenevolence (s) (noun), omnibenevolences (pl)
Universal generosity, kindness, acts of charity or support for all, without prejudice: There are some nongovernmental organizations in poor countries which are acting under a mandate of omnibenevolence by extending their help to everyone possible.
omnibenevolent (adjective), more omnibenevolent, most omnibenevolent
A reference to showing goodwill, kindness, and charitableness for all people: Food was being distributed as an omnibenevolent gift to all of the flood victims.
omnibus
omnicide
The destruction of everything as in a nuclear war.

Related "all, every" word unit: pan-, panto-.