dis-, di-, dif-

(Latin: separation, apart, asunder; removal, away, from; negation, deprivation, undoing, reversal, utterly, completely; in different directions)

The meaning of dis- varies with different words; dif-, assimilated form of dis- before f; di-, form of dis- before b, d, g, l, m, n, r, and v.

disclose (dis KLOHZ) verb), discloses; disclosed; disclosing
To reveal something that has been kept a secret: The reporter refused to disclose the source of the information he presented in his article.

So far, the identity of the robbery victim has not been disclosed to the public by the police.

discloser (s) (noun), disclosers (pl)
disclosure (s) (noun), disclosures (pl)
discoloration
discomfit (verb), discomfits; discomfited; discomfiting
To make someone confused or upset: The administer was discomfited by the decrease in sales of his company's products.
To frustrate and to confuse.
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discomfiture (s) (noun), discomfitures (pl)
A feeling of disappointment, frustration, and embarrassment: Mark noticed the discomfiture of his wife being in the company of his loud and boisterous colleagues.
A feeling of defeat in achieving one's objectives.
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discomfort
discomfortable (adjective)
discomfortableness
discomfortably
discommode (verb), discommodes; discommoded; discommoding
To cause problems, discomforts, or inconveniences for someone: Without knowing it, Mary’s young son was discommoding his mother by leaving all his toys, books, clothes, etc. on the floor making it very difficult to keep the house tidy and clean.
To make inconvenient, to trouble, or to disturb.
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To cause an inconvenience or to annoy.
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discompose (verb), discomposes; discomposed; discomposing
1. To disturb or to agitate someone: Tom discomposed his grandmother while she was taking an afternoon nap by turning on the TV and turning up the volume as he was watching a football game.
2. Etymology: from Latin dis-, "opposite of" + com, "put together, arrange" + poser, "to place."
To disturb, to agitate, or to perturb.
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disconcert (verb), disconcerts; disconcerted; disconcerting
1. To make someone feel upset or embarrassed: News about Marie's car accident as she was driving to work was disconcerting her employer very much.
2. Making a person feel ill at ease and slightly confused: The news that his scheduled flight had been canceled again disconcerted the salesman who had arranged an important meeting with a company executive.
3. To disturb or to make other people feel uncomfortable: The financial situation around the world has disconcerted many nations.
To upset or to disturb.
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To confuse and to disturb.
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To upset and to throw into confusion.
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disconcertedly (adverb), more disconcertedly, most disconcertedly
A reference to the frustration a person has about making plans and having them thrown fall apart: The airline flights back home were disconcertedly not scheduled until three weeks later.
disconcertedness (s) (noun) (usually no plural)
Being disturbed, confused, and greatly embarrassed: Sam was experiencing disconcertedness when he realized that he was wearing two different shoes..