ag-, agen-, act-, agi-, agit-

(Latin: to set in motion, to hurry, to shake; to drive; to do, to act; to lead, to conduct, to guide)

coagulate (verb), coagulates; coagulated; coagulating
1. To convert, to clot, or to curdle a fluid or a substance that is in a solution into a solid or a gel.
2. Etymology: from Middle French coaguler, from Latin coagulatus, past participle of coagulare, "to cause to curdle"; from cogere, "to curdle, to collect"; from com-, "together" + agere "to drive, to move".
coagulated (adjective), more coagulated, most coagulated
Pertaining to something that changes from a liquid form to a soft more semisolid or solid mass.
coagulation (s) (noun), coagulations (pl)
1. The process of forming semisolid lumps in a liquid.
2. In medicine, the clotting of blood or the process by which the blood clots to form solid masses.

Tissue can also be subjected to coagulation by various means, as by electrocoagulation (coagulation [clotting] of tissue using a high-frequency electrical current applied locally with a metal instrument or needle with the aim of stopping bleeding); laser coagulation (produces light in the visible green wavelength that is selectively absorbed by hemoglobin, the pigment in red blood cells, in order to seal off bleeding blood vessels); or photocoagulation (coagulation [clotting] of tissue using a laser which produces light in the visible green wavelength that is selectively absorbed by hemoglobin, the pigment in red blood cells, in order to seal off bleeding blood vessels).

coagulopathy
Disease affecting the coagulability of the blood.
cogency (s) (noun), cogencies (pl)
A situation in which someone is convincing or persuasive.
cogent (adjective), more cogent, most cogent
1. A descriptive term for appealing to the intellect or powers of reasoning; convincing: Sharon presented a cogent argument for raising the prices for the scarce items.
2. Etymology: from French cogent, "necessary, urgent" (14 century); from Latin cogentem , from cogere, "to curdle, to compel, to collect"; from com-, "together" + agere, "to drive".
Appealing or convincing to the mind.
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Having a compelling force.
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Having a powerful mental order.
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A significant reason.
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A convincing consideration.
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cogently (adverb), more cogently, most cogently
Descriptive of having a manner or reasonable and convincing procedures based on evidence.
cogitate (verb), cogitates; cogitated; cogitating
1. To think deeply and carefully about something; to ponder: When James got back to the university dormitory, he sat at his desk and started to cogitate about the science project he was supposed to complete in three days.
2. To consider seriously; to reflect upon; to turn over in one's mind: When the election for President of the U.S. takes place, voters will be cogitating about which candidate will be the best one for the country.
3. Etymology: from Latin cogitatus, past participle of cogitare, "to ponder, to weigh, to reflect, to think", from co-, short for com-, "with, together" + agitare, "to put in constant motion, to drive, to impel"; from agere, "to set in motion, to drive, to lead".
To consider or to think about.
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To ponder or to meditate.
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cogitation (s) (noun), cogitations (pl)
1. Thoughtful and attentive consideration and meditation: After much cogitation and mulling over, James decided to take the offer of the job in his hometown.
2. A careful and serious mental reflection about something: David applied all of his cogitation and energy, contemplating what topic he should take for the next term paper in his science class at school.
A thought or consideration.
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cogitative (adjective), more cogitative, most cogitative
Inclined to or capable of cogitation (serious thought).
cogitatively (adverb), more cogitatively, most cogitatively
A reference to, or characteristic of, meditating, contemplating, or being thoughtful.
cogitator (s) (noun), cogitators (pl)
Cogito ergo sum. Deo gratias.
I think, therefore I am. Thanks be to God.

Motto of Shorter College, North Little Rock, Arkansas, USA.

Cogito, ergo doleo.
I think, therefore I am depressed.

Also translated as, "I think, therefore I exist."

Credited to Descartes [French philosopher] as a priori proof of one's existence in his Discourse on Method, and is used as the starting point for his philosophic system.

corrigibility
That which is capable of being corrected, improved, or reformed.