monstro-, monstr-, mone-, monu-, moni-

(Latin: monere, to warn; to remind, to advise, to instruct)

monstrance (s) (noun), monstrances (pl)
In the Roman Catholic Church, a receptacle that holds the Host (the consecrated bread or wafer of the Eucharist or Communion for the Mass) [Latin: monstrum, "portent, monster" from monstrare, "to show, point out, indicate"].
monstricide (s) (noun), monstricides (pl)
1. In medicine, destruction of a fetal monster.
2. The slaughter of monsters.
monstrosity (s) (noun), monstrosities (pl)
An object, animal, or person that is very unpleasant or frightening to look at, often because it is so enormous and strangely shaped: In one of the tents at the circus exhibition, there was a monstrosity of a man who was shockingly hideous and frightful.
Something that is abnormal by being very bad or shocking.
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monstrous (adjective), more monstrous, most monstrous
1. Enormous; shocking; horrible: The monstrous man was seen in a restaurant eating an abnormally large amount of food.
2. Wicked, cruel, or unpleasant to an extent that is considerably unacceptable: There are millions of refugees who are fleeing for their lives to find safer places to live because of the monstrous killings that are going on in so many countries!
3. Greatly different from what is considered to be normal: There are a lot of people who have been suffering from monstrous heat waves this summer.
A reference to something that is great, outrageous, and shocking.
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monstrously (adverb)
Something done in a way or to an extent that shocks or offends other people.
monstrousness (s) (noun)
1. Plants and animals that are abnormal in structure.
2. Very ugly, cruel, or vicious.
3. Abnormal, hideous, or unnatural in size, character, etc
monstrum (s) (noun), monstra (pl)
In medicine, a horribly deformed person.
monument (s) (noun), monuments (pl)
1. An important site or sculpture that is marked and preserved as public property.
2. Etymology: from Latin monumentum, "a monument, a memorial"; literally, "something that reminds", from monere, "to remind, to warn".
monumental (adjective), more monumental, most monumental
1. Impressively large, sturdy, and enduring: Repairing the damage done to the homes caused by the gigantic hurricane will be a monumental task.
2. Of outstanding significance: Abraham Lincoln's monumental Gettysburg Address will always be a classic that will be unprecedented.
Characteristic of being huge, massive, impressive, and notable.
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monumentally (adverb)
1. Important and of outstanding significance.
2. Massive in size or bulk.
multimonstrous (adjective)
Consisting of many frightening sizes, shapes, and ugliness.
premonish (verb), premonishes; premonished; premonishing
To give advanced warning before something is about to happen: The mechanic premonished the owner of the car that he should get his brakes repaired immediately or he would have a serious accident!
premonition (s) (noun), premonitions (pl)
1. A forewarning; a prior warning or notification: Jack remembers that before the earthquake took place, his two dogs were restless and greatly disturbed; as if, they had premonitions that the shaking of the area was about to happen.
2. A feeling about a situation or an event before it takes place: Martin Luther King presented a speech consisting of premonitions of his death just days before he was murdered in 1968.
An advance warning that something bad will happen.
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premonitory (adjective) (not comparable)
A reference to something that serves as a warning that a misfortunate thing can or will happen: The funnel-shaped clouds whirling toward the ground provided premonitory actions that tornadoes were approaching and so people should get into shelters as soon as possible.
A warning beforehand as a signal that something is about to happen.
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Quod erat demonstrandum.
1. "That which was to be proven."
2. A phrase used to signal that a proof has just been completed.
3. Used in a formal conclusion to indicate that something; such as, evidence of a fact is proof of the theory that has just been been advanced.