chrono-, chron-

(Greek: time, times; sequence of times)

chronological (adjective), more chronological, most chronological
Relating to the order of time, series, or events during which something happens: A chronological age refers to a person's actual length of life in years as calculated from birth which is opposed to any age classification based on the rate of mental development.

Although Samuel had the chronological existence of six years as a little boy, he seemed to have the mental characteristics of a teenager.

Time goes, you say? Ah no! Alas, Time stays, we go.
—Austin Dobson (1840-1921), British author
A reference to the order of time that is in a series.
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chronological succession
A following of one thing after another in time.
chronology
1. The science of computing and adjusting time or periods of time, and of recording and arranging events in the order of time; computation of time, assignation of events to their correct dates.
2. A chronological table, list, or treatise.
3. The scientific study of time and the sequence of events.
chronomancy, chromomantic
Divination to determine the precise favorable time for some action, formerly practiced especially in China.
chronometer
1. In horlology, the time of day as indicated by a chronometer set to Greenwich Mean Time.
2. An instrument for measuring time; specifically applied to time-keepers adjusted to keep accurate time in all variations of temperature.
3. Chronometers are said to differ from watches by having a more perfect escapement and a compensation balance, and are used for determining longitude at sea, and for other exact observations.
chronometric dating
1. Any method of dating that relies on chronological measurements; such as, calendars, radiocarbon dates, etc.
2. In archaeology, any method of dating that relies on chronological measurements; such as, calendars, radiocarbon dates, etc.
chronometric encoder
In electronics, an encoder that converts information into digital form by counting electrical pulses.
chronometry
The art or science of accurately measuring time; or the measurement of intervals of time.
chronomyometer
An instrument for measuring the chronaxy or electric reaction of a muscle.
chrono-oncology
An anticancer treatment based on the timing of drug administration.
chronopharmacology
A branch of chronobiology concerned with the effects of drugs upon the timing of biological events and rhythms, and the relation of biological timing to the effects of drugs.
chronopher
1. A device that generates standard time signal pulses from a clock or other timing mechanism.
2. An apparatus for the distribution of electric time-signals.
chronophilia
A paraphilia in which sexual satisfaction depends on the age of the partner; most frequently, the partner must be of a greatly different age than the subject (chronophilic disparity). The term includes ephebophilia (adolescents are the sexual object), gerontophilia (the partner must be older, of parental or grandparental age), nepiophilia (infants), and pedophilia (juveniles).
chronophilia, chronophily
A sexual perversion in which sexual satisfaction depends on the age of the partner; most frequently, the partner must be of significantly different age than the subject (chronophilic disparity).

The term includes ephebophilia (adolescents are the sexual object), gerontophilia (the partner must be older, of parental or grandparental age), nepiophilia (infants), and pedophilia (juveniles).

chronophobia (s) (noun), chronophobias (pl)
Discomfort concerning the duration or immensity of time: Chronophobia is a common psycho-neurosis and anxiety of prison inmates and is also known as "stir crazy" by them.

Since chronophobia is considered the most common psychiatric disorder in prison inmates, sooner or later almost all prisoners suffer from it to some degree and it occurs in every potential neurotic who goes to prison.

After the novelty of prison has worn off and the real length of the sentence is felt, chronophobia sets in and the prisoner may go into a panic, usually while in his cell, and fears his enclosure and restraint, but this apparent claustrophobia arises from fear of time, as represented by the prison.

Following early anxieties, the chronophobia of the prisoner may become essentially a phlegmatic, indifferent automaton who serves the rest of his sentence by the clock and lives wholly in the present, one day at a time.

Chronophobia is characterized by panic, anxiety, and claustrophobia which is exhibited by prisoners having difficulty adjusting to long prison sentences.