-agogic-, -agogue, -agog, -agogic, -agoguery, -agogy

(Greek: usually a suffix meaning: lead, leading, leading forth, guide, guiding; bring, take; promoting, stimulating)

hypnagogue
1. A hypnotic agent that induces sleep.
2. An agent causing sleepiness or drowsiness.
hypnapagogic
1. Inducing sleep or induced by sleep.
2. In psychology, pertaining to hallucinations or dreams that occur just before the loss of consciousness.
3. Denoting a condition similar to the hypnagogic, through which the mind passes in coming out of sleep; denoting also hallucinations experienced at such times.
isagoge
1. Introductory to any branch of study.
2. Introductory studies; especially, that department of theology that is introductory to exegesis, and is concerned with the literary and external history of the books of the Bible.
isagogic
lactagog
lactagogue
Adapted to produce a flow of milk.
lithagogue
Having the power to expel calculi (“stones”) from the kidneys or bladder.
lymphagogue
An agent that increases the formation and flow of lymph.
melanagogal
melanagogue
Having the property of expelling black bile.
menagogue
mystagogic
Pertaining to a mystagogue or mystagogy; relating to instruction in mysteries.
mystagogue
1. In Ancient Greece, one who gave preparatory instruction to candidates for initiation into the Eleusinian or other mysteries.; hence, one who introduces someone to religious mysteries, a hierophant; a teacher of mystical doctrines.
2. One who keeps church relics and shows them to strangers.
mystagogy
Initiation, or instruction preparatory to initiation into mysteries.
pantagogue (s) (noun), pantagogues (pl)
A medicine that once was believed capable of purging away or expelling all morbid or unhealthy matter from the body.

Cross references of word families related directly, or indirectly, to: "master, lead, leading, ruler, ruling, govern": agon-; arch-; -crat; dom-; gov-; magist-; poten-; regi-; tyran-.