stalac-, stalag-

(Greek > Latin: dropping, dripping; trickling; to drip, to drop, to trickle)

stalactic
Deposited by dripping water; pertaining to or consisting of stalactites.
stalactical
Of the nature of a stalactite; resembling or pertaining to stalactites.
stalactiform
Having the form of a stalactite.
stalactite (stuh LAK tight")
A conical or roughly cylindrical speleothem formed by dripping water and hanging from the roof of a cave like an icicle; usually composed of calcium carbonate: "When we went to the cave, we could see the stalactites hanging from the ceiling."
stalactite
1. An icicle-like formation of calcium carbonate (calcite or aragonite), dripping from the roof or sides of a cavern and produced by the dropping of water over a long time which has percolated through, and partially dissolved, the overlying limestone.
2. A conical hanging pillar in a limestone cave that has gradually built up as a deposit from ground water seeping through the cave's roof.
stalactitic
Having the form or structure of a stalactite, resembling or pertaining to stalactites.
stalacto-stalagmite (stuh LAK toh-stuh LAG might)
A columnar deposit formed by the union of a stalactite with its complementary stalagmite composed of mineral-rich water: "The combination of stalactites and stalagmites caused an interesting stalacto-stalagmite formation in this very large cave."

Illustrations of stalacto-stalagmites

The father is explaining the stalactite in a cave.
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See Jimmy, this is a stalactite, a word that comes from Modern Latin stalactites; but before that it came from Greek, stalaktos, meaning "dripping, dropping," or "to drip."




The father continues to explain about a stalagmite.
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Now, this is a stalagmite, which also came from Greek stalagma, "a drop," or stalagmos, "dropping;" through New Latin stalagmites, "a drop" and both of them came from stalassein, stalak-, "to drip."




And finally, father explains that when they are joined, we have a stalemate.
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Finally, when a stalactite and a stalagmite join, we end up with a stalemate.


Just joking. It's really called a stalacto-stalagmite and it is pronounced [stuh LAK toh-stuh LAG might]. It is defined as a columnar deposit formed by the union of a stalactite with its complementary stalagmite composed of mineral-rich water; but, if it is easier for you to remember, it is also called a "column". Now you know all about these cave formations, don't you?



Identity Problem in the Mammoth Caves

O pendant stalactite,

Deposit crystalline,

Insensate troglodyte

Shaped of accreted brine,


Aspire you still to pierce

That upright stalagmite

Who in a million years

Your love cannot requite?


And if indeed your drip

With ardor one day fill her,

And bring you lip to lip,

And make you two one pillar …


Still, how can you be sure,

O pendant stalactite,

If you are you, or her—

An upright stalagmite?

—Willard R. Espy

Pointing to an stalactite, stalagmite article Additonal information about stalactites and stalagmites.

stalagmite
1. A conical pillar in a limestone cave that is gradually built upward from the floor as a deposit from ground water seeping mineral-rich water through and dripping from the cave's roof.
2. An incrustation or deposit, more or less like an inverted stalactite, on the floor of a cavern, formed by the dropping from the roof of some calcite or aragonite in solution.
stalagmitic
Formed in the same way as a stalagmite, composed of stalagmites or having their form or character.
stalagmometer
An apparatus for measuring drops.
stalagmoscope
1. An instrument for viewing drops.
2. An instrument for determining exactly the number of drops in a given quantity of liquid, used as a measure of the surface tension of a fluid.

Related "cave, cavern" word sources: cav-, cavern; speleo-; spelunc-, spelunk-; troglo--.