apt-, ept-

(Latin: fit, fitted, suited, suitable, appropriate; join, fasten)

adapt
1. To make suitable by changing or adjusting; accommodate, assimilate, harmonize with, conform to: "The chameleon adapts to its surroundings by changing color."
2. To fit for a new use; transform, rework, convert, make suitable, modify, alter: "The drama was adapted from a short story."
3. To undergo modification so as to fit new circumstances or situations.
4. Etymology: from Latin adaptare, "to adjust" from ad-, "to" plus aptare, "to join" from aptus, "fitted".
adapt, adept, adopt
adapt (uh DAPT) (verb)
1. To make suitable by transforming or adjusting; to conform to: The chameleon can adapt to its surroundings by changing its color.
The eminent sociologist could not adapt himself to such a primitive society.
2. To fit for a new use; rework, convert, make suitable, modify, alter: The team of producers will adapt the drama from a short story.
adept (uh DEPT) (adjective)
Skillful, adroit, proficient: Milly is adept at organizational work while her husband is adept in needlecraft.
adopt (uh DAHPT) (verb)
1. To choose as one’s own child: Many childless couples adopt children.
2. To take up and use (an idea, a practice, etc.) as one’s own: The new CEO wanted to adopt a Latin motto for the company business.
3. To accept and to put into effect; formally approve: Schools should adopt new methods of teaching English vocabulary if they want to enhance the word knowledge of their students.

Jennifer proved herself to be very adept at learning to adapt to new situations; especially, when her company decided to adopt new regulations for the employee's parking lot.

adaptability
adaptable (adjective)
adaptableness
adaptably
adaptation
adapter
adept (adjective), more adept, most adept
1. Highly proficient or expert at something: Shirley is adept at organizational work in her community while her husband is adept in working with wood for shelves for their home.
2. Having or showing knowledge and skill and aptitude: Erin was adept in writing her column in the newspaper every day.
3. Etymology: from Latin adeptus, "attained, achieved".
Very skillful and proficient.
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adeptly
adeptness
adeptus
Adept.

"One who has attained." The alchemists applied the term vere adeptus, "truly adept", to anyone who claimed to have found the Elixir of Life or the Philosopher's Stone.

adipis, adipes, adeps
1. Denoting fat or adipose tissue.
2. The rendered fat of swine, lard, used in the preparation of ointments (synonym: lard).
apt
1. Exactly suitable and appropriate: "He presented an apt reply to what happened."
2. Having a natural tendency or to be inclined: "Her mother is apt to be easily offended by such criticism."
3. Quick to learn or to understand: "He was an apt student of chemistry and math."
aptitude (AP ti tood", AP ti tyood") (s) (noun), aptitudes (pl)
1. A natural ability to do something or to have the talent to obtain knowledge: Since Kelsey can speak five languages, she obviously has a great aptitude for learning languages.

Sam's son had no aptitude for sports; however, he did have an aptitude for computer technology, so he spent more of his time studying to be a computer programmer.

2. An inherent competency, as for learning: Dwayne's son said that he would be taking a new test at school which is supposed to measure his aptitude for learning.

Someone who can speak so many languages obviously has a great natural aptitude for learning.

3. Etymology: from Latin aptitudo, "fitness"; from Latin aptus, "joined, fitted"; meaning from "natural capacity to learn" is from the 1540s; that of "quality of being fit for a purpose or position" is from the 1640's + -tude, "quality, condition of".
A natural or acquired talent or ability.
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