itiner-, it-, -it

(Latin: to go, to walk away; to travel, to journey, a journey)

issuer (s), issuers (pl) (nouns)
itinerancy
itinerant (adjective), more itinerant, most itinerant
1. Relating to a person who travels or wanders from place to place: Homeless people are known to be itinerant rovers.
2. Etymology: from Latin itinerari, "to journey about".
A reference to going from one place to another one.
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itinerary (s) (noun), itineraries (pl)
1. An account or a record of a journey: Jack picked up the flight itinerary, including the documents, at the travel agency which showed them when they were to be at the airport and when they would arrive at their destination.
2. A detailed travel plan or a schedule for a trip: The travel company sent Robert and Mary an itinerary of the route of their upcoming journey to Canada.
The plan for a proposed route of travel.
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itinerate
janitor
1. A door-keeper or porter.
2. A caretaker of a building, especially of a school, who has charge of the cleaning, heating, etc.
obituary; obiit. obit. (noun); obituaries; obiits. obits. (pl)
1. An article that is published about the life of a person who has recently died: Henry saw his friend's obituary in the local newspaper that morning which revealed his many achievements in the town before he passed away.
2. A death list or an inscription found on tombstones and in church records: Obiit is found on many tombstones, abbreviated as "ob.": "nasc. 1901, ob. 1933"; and the English word obituary comes from this Latin element.

3. Etymology: from 1706, "register of deaths"; from Middle Latin obituarius, "a record of the death of a person"; literally, "pertaining to death", from Latin obitus, "departure, a going to meet, an encounter" (a euphemism for "death"); from the stem of obire, "to go, to meet"; such as, in mortem obire "to meet death"; from ob, "to, toward" + ire, "to go".

Since the Latin verb obire means "to go to" or "to go over"; it is thought to be a reference to the River Styx and certainly it is no less euphemistic than our modern expression "to pass over".

A death notice that is usually in a newspaper.
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A notification of death; especially, with a biographical sketch.
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perish
1. To die or to be destroyed through violence, privation, etc.; such as, to perish in an earthquake.
2. To pass away or disappear.
3. To suffer destruction or ruin.
4. To suffer spiritual death.
5. "Perish the thought", may it never happen; used facetiously or as an afterthought of foreboding.
perishable
preterit, preterite
1. A term in grammar for a verb tense expressing something that happened or was done in the past.
2. Etymology: from the 14th century, via Old French preterit from Latin praeteritum as in tempus praeteritum, "time past, time gone by" or "past time".

From the past participle of praeterire, "to pass over something"; from the late 16th century; Late Latin praeterition, "a passing by"; from Latin praeterire "to go by"; from prae-, "before" + itum, the past participle of ire, "to go".

sedition (s) (noun), seditions (pl)
1. An organized insurrection, rebellion, or an incitement against a government: Mike's brother was arrested and charged with sedition because he wrote something that urged people to rebel against the political leadership of their country.
2. Etymology: from Old French sedicion; from Latin seditionem, seditio, "civil disorder, dissention"; literally, "a going apart, a separation"; from sed-, "apart" + itio "a going"; from ire, "to go".
Resistance to a government.
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seditionary (s) (noun), seditionaries (pl)
A person who does something by speech or writing with the intention of promoting rebellion or some kind of resistance against a government.
seditionary (adjective), more seditionary, most seditionary
Descriptive of anything that is meant to encourage the removal of a government, or the leader of a state or a country, by force or to defy such an established authority.
seditionist (s) (noun), seditionists (pl)
A person, or people, who strive to incite people to rebel against the authority of a state or monarch: "The man's speech to the group was enough to label him as a seditionist and it also resulted in his arrest by government agents."
seditious (adjective), more seditious, most seditious
A reference to inciting or causing people to rebel against an authority of some form of government or a state: The seditious comments on television by the politician resulted in his being arrested and his claim that he was only exercising his "right to free speech".
Tending to excite a rebellion against a government.
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Tending to excite a rebellion against a lawful authority.
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