You searched for: “magnitude
magnitude (MAG ni tood", MAG ni tyood") (s) (noun), magnitudes (pl)
1. The quality or fact of being great, in various senses; in the physical sense, great size or extent: Mr. Smith's students were speechless with the magnitude of the science assignment he presented to them and which was due in two weeks.
2. Loudness and the intensity or extreme volume of sounds: Sometimes the magnitude of the orchestra in the small theater significantly disturbed some members of the audience.
3. Greatness of character, rank, or position; also as a humorous title of address: The owner of the large company had duties and responsibilities of such magnitudes that he had to hire additional experts to help him accomplish them.
4. A reference to immaterial things with a great degree or importance: The professor is a scientist of considerable magnitude and eminence.
5. The intrinsic size of an earthquake or underground explosion: The magnitude of the tremors were impossible for the people who lived in the affected area to endure.
Significant importance.
© ALL rights are reserved.

Greatness of size.
© ALL rights are reserved.

Go to this Word A Day Revisited Index
so you can see more of Mickey Bach's cartoons.

This entry is located in the following units: magni-, magn-; magna (page 3) -tude (page 3)
(Latin: quantity having magnitude and direction; carrier, bearer, conveyer; from the stem of vehere, "to carry, to convey, to cart")
Word Entries at Get Words: “magnitude
magnitude
A measure of the brightness or luminosity of a star or other celestial object.

The larger the number referring to the magnitude, the fainter the object.

Zero, or first magnitude, indicates some of the brightest stars.

Still brighter are those of negative magnitude; such as, Sirius, whose magnitude is -1.46.

This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 15)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “magnitude
absolute magnitude, M
1. The magnitude a celestial object would appear to have if it were at a distance of ten parsecs (10 times 3.261633 light years or 32.62 parsecs).
2. A measure of the true or intrinsic brightness of a star as if all stars were the same distance (32.6 light-years) from the observer.
This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 1)
absolute visual magnitude, Mv
The absolute magnitude of an object measured through a special yellowish filter that approximates the visual range of the human eye.
This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 1)
apparent magnitude (m)
1. Magnitude as seen by an observer.
2. The brightness of a star as seen from the earth.
3. A measure of the brightness of stars as they appear on the celestial sphere.
This entry is located in the following unit: Astronomy and related astronomical terms (page 2)