You searched for: “life
Quotes: Life, Living
A fashion show between our naked arrival into the world and our dressed departure: life, living quotes.
This entry is located in the following unit: Quotes: Quotations Units (page 4)
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Units related to: “life
(a fashion show between our naked arrival into the world and our dressed departure)
(Latin: animating, enlivening; vigorous, vigor, active; to be alive, activity, to quicken; then a quickening action of growing; a specific sense of "plant cultivated for food, edible herb, or root" is first recorded in 1767; the differences between the meanings from its original links with "life, liveliness" was completed in the early twentieth century, when vegetable came to be used for an "inactive person".)
(Latin: life, living, pertaining to life, essential to life)
(Latin: life, alive)
(Latin: animal life, a living creature; living; breath; soul; mind)
(the Sun god who brings life-giving heat and light to Earth)
(Greek: without life; nitrogen)
(the production of natural-life mimics)
(Greek > Latin: plants, plant life [originally, "herb, grass, pasture"] to botany)
(Part 2 of 4: "The Ballad of Salvation Bill" by Robert Service was based on experiences he had with a compulsive smoker who just had to smoke because smoking was so important in his life)
(Latin: flower; full of flowers, abounding in flowers; flora, plant life, plants of a general region or period)
(from the depths of the ocean floors to the highest mountains, from dry deserts to grasslands, and the warm and wet tropical areas; all provide each form of life its preferred habitat)
(having feelings of pleasure or happiness are among the highest achievements of life)
(Trying to find solutions to two life-robbing diseases: Alzheimer's and Parkinson's)
(myths and science fiction regarding nanotechnology)
(Greek: said to be a stem for "all, every, whole", or "complete"; that is, a field of study in biology that refers to the whole set of omics including their -omics and -ome subfields in order to understand life as a holistic existence and organic beings as a whole)
(importance of plankton in marine life)
(Latin: individual; not in public life; apart from the State; belonging to an individual)
(Greek: mind, spirit, consciousness; mental processes; the human soul; breath of life; literally, "that which breathes" or "breathing")
(fluid of life from ancestors, parents, and transfusions; something that survives by circulating)
(failure in life takes place when we live and fail to learn; what we don't know, we can learn)
(a belief that teaches people to spend the best parts of their lives preparing to avoid the worst that could come after this life)
(Latin: from Old French seculer; from Late Latin sæcularis, worldly, living in the world, not belonging to a religious order; from saecularis, pertaining to a generation or age; from saeculum, saeclum, period of a man's life, generation; period of a hundred years)
(Latin: breath of life, breath, breathing; mind; spirit, "soul"; courage)
Word Entries containing the term: “life
An Introduction to the Biology of Marine Life

James L. Sumich, Grossmont College; Wm. C. Brown Publishers, College Edition; Dubuque, Iowa; 1988.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 1)
biological half-life
The time required for the quantity of a material in a specified tissue, organ, or region of the body; especially, a toxin; to reduce in quantity by half as a result of biological processes.
ion mean life
1. A term for the time it takes for an electron to escape from an atom or molecule and attach itself to another atom or molecule.
2. The average time between the ionization of an atom or molecule and its recombination with one or more electrons, or its loss of excess electrons.
3. The average time interval under specified atmospheric conditions between the formation and destruction of an ion of any given type.

The mean life of small ions in clean air, for example, over the sea, is four to five minutes, but in polluted air it is generally less than a minute.

Large ions have mean lifetimes of as much as 15 to 20 minutes over the oceans, while in very polluted areas, lifetimes may approach an hour.

This entry is located in the following unit: ion, ion- + (page 3)
larger than life or larger-than-life (adjective) (no comparatives)
1. Bigger than the size of an actual person or thing: Of course, the statue is larger than life.
2. Someone who has an unusually exciting, impressive, or appealing quality: Jim's father was a remarkable man who always seemed to be larger than life to his children.

This adjectival expression is hyphenated (larger-than-life) when it is placed immediately before the noun which it modifies.

This entry is located in the following unit: larg-, largi- (page 1)
Life on Man

Theodor Rosebury; The Viking Press; New York; 1969.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 1)
maricole (verb), maricoles; maricoled; maricoling: sea life
Thriving in the sea; such as, aquatic organisms, both tiny and large, are able to accomplish.
Nanotechnology: Fear Negative Results for Life on Earth
A presentation of mostly unfounded fears of nanotechnology and how it may affect life on earth in a negative way.
This entry is located in the following unit: Nanotechnology: Index of Articles (page 1)
Pleasure, Charm, and Beauty in Human Life and in Nature: Graces
Greek: Graces (goddesses); Aglaia (brilliance); Euphrosyne (joy); Thalia (bloom)
Latin: (no equivalent goddess)
This entry is located in the following units: gods and goddesses from Greek and Latin Myths (page 2) nasc-, nat- (page 5)
The Life That Lives on Man

Michael Andrews; Taplinger Publishing Company; New York; 1976.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 2)
The New Encyclopedia of Aquatic Life Volume One

Aquatic Invertebrates and Fishes; edited by Andrew Campbell and John Dawes; Facts on File Natural Science Library; Facts On File, Inc.; New York; printed in China; 2004.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 2)
The New Encyclopedia of Aquatic Life Volume Two

Aquatic Invertebrates and Fishes; edited by Andrew Campbell and John Dawes; Facts on File Natural Science Library; Facts On File, Inc.; New York; printed in China; 2004.

This entry is located in the following unit: Bibliography of Sources Regarding Habitat and Dwelling Environments (page 2)
Word Entries at Get Words: “life
life
The period during which a system is capable of operating above a specified performance level.
This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 12)
life (s) (noun), lives (pl)
1. Someone or something that has an active physical presence and behaviours, e.g. consumes nutrition, grows, etc.: The lives of famous people have been recorded in many books and movies.

The earthquake claimed hundreds of lives.

2. The habits and expectations of inhabitants of a particular place: Some people prefer city life while others want country life.
3. The time from birth to death: Life begins when a person is born and ends when he or she dies.

Jarrod knew what he wanted to do early in life.

(Latin: to give "life to" and so, showing movements)
(Various living organisms are organized from the smallest unit of cells to form tissues which form organs and organs work together to form organ systems)
(A visual presentation of various plants, animals, insects and other forms of life in their environments)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “life
activated shelf life
The length of time, at a specified temperature, that a charged battery can be stored before its capacity falls to an unusable level.
This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 1)
battery cycle life
The number of cycles, to a specified depth of discharge, that a cell or battery can undergo before failing to meet its specified capacity or efficiency performance criteria.
This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 3)
battery life
The period during which a cell or battery is capable of operating above a specified capacity or efficiency performance level.

Life may be measured in cycles and/or years, depending on the type of service for which the cell or battery is intended.

This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 3)
float life
The number of years that a battery can keep its stated capacity when it is kept at float charge.
This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 9)
life expectancy
A calculation, based on statistical data, of the average life span of an organism.
life-cycle cost, life cycle cost
The estimated cost of owning and operating a photovoltaic system for the period of its useful life.
This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 12)
shelf life of batteries
The length of time, under specified conditions, that a battery can be stored so that it keeps its guaranteed capacity.
This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 19)
wet shelf life
The period of time that a charged battery, when filled with electrolyte, can remain unused before dropping below a specified level of performance.
This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 24)