You searched for: “from greek
Units related to: “from greek
(Greek > Latin: bambacium, "cotton fabric"; from bombax, "cotton"; from Latin, bombyx, "silk, silkworm"; from Greek, bombux, "silkworm")
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, aktis, aktinos ray; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, astatos, unstable; radioactive nonmetal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, baros, heavy; because its compounds are dense; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, chroma, color; because many of its compounds are colored; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, dysprositos, hard to get at; difficult to access; hard to obtain; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, helios, the sun, first observed in the sun’s atmosphere; gas)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, iris, a "rainbow", because of the changing color of its salts; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, lanthanein, "hidden", "to be concealed"; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, lithos, "stone, stony"; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, molybdos, "lead"; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek, neo, "new" plus didymon, "twin" [with the element praseodymium]; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, osme, "smell", "malodorousness", "stink"; metal)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, named in honor of the asteroid Pallas, which was discovered at about the same time; and for Pallas, the Greek goddess of wisdom; metal)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, rhodon, "rose"; in reference to the red color of its salts; metal)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, selene, the moon; nonmetal)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, technetos, "artificial"; the first man-made artificial element; radioactive metal)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, thallos, "a young, or green, twig or shoot" [based on the color of its spectrum]; metal)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, Thule, the Greek name for land north of Britain or for Scandinavia; rare earth)
(Modern Latin: from Greek, xenon, "stranger"; gas)
(Arabic > Greek > Latin: the art of combining base metals [to make gold]; from Greek, chemia, “Egypt”, supposedly where the art of changing metals into gold existed)
(Greek > Latin: mark, reproach; shame, disgrace; from Greek, puncture; brand; tattoo mark; point)
(Latin: elbow; larger bone of the forearm [from Greek: olene])
(Greek > Latin: suffix; from French -aque, or directly from Latin -acus, from Greek -akos forming adjectives. This suffix was used to form names of arts and sciences in Greek and it is now generally used to form new names of sciences in English; meanings, "related to, of the nature of, pertaining to, referring to")
(Greek: stormy wind, whirlwind; from Greek mythology, Aëllo, a harpy; whose name literally means, "Stormswift")
(Greek > Latin: [receptacle], vessel, often a blood vessel; "covered by a seed or vessel", a seed vessel; a learned borrowing from Greek meaning "vessel", "container")
(Latin: lime, calcium; heel, bone of the tarsus; to tread; derived from calx, calcis, "limestone, lime, pebble"; from Greek words halix and psephos, "small stone, pebble".)
(Latin: chamber; from Greek kamara, anything with a vaulted or arched cover; a vault, arched ceiling, or roof)
(Greek > Latin: formless matter; especially from Greek, gulf, chasm, abyss, the rude unformed mass; and by extension, "confusion and disorder")
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek and Latin, alumen, a substance having an astringent taste; metal)
(Modern Latin: chemical element; from Greek and Latin, cadmia, earthy or earth; metal)
(Modern Latin: some say it comes from Greek proto, "first"; plus actinium, "ray"; so, “first actinium”; radioactive metal)
(Latin: finger, toe; from Greek daktylos)
(mythology for all seasons)
(Latin: magpie; related to Latin, picus, "woodpecker"; probably translated from Greek kissa, kitta, "magpie, jay")
(Latin: from Medieval Latin sciatica, in sciatica passio, "sciatic disease", from feminine of sciaticus, "sciatic"; from Latin ischiadicus, "of pain in the hip"; from Greek iskhiadikos, iskhias, iskhiados, "pain in the hips"; from iskhion, "hip joint".)
(Greek > Latin: ankle, tarsal plate of the eyelid; from Greek tarsos, frame of wickerwork; broad, flat surface, as also in tarsos podos, the flat of the foot, instep of the foot; the edge of the eyelid)