You searched for: “field
Units related to: “field
(Latin: rustic, rural; pertaining to the fields; from ager then agrestis, "field")
(Greek: land, soil, field, fields; earth; wild, as one who lives in the fields; wildness; savage, savageness)
(Greek: open woodland, meadow, field)
(Greek: sleeplessness, wakefulness; originally, it meant "sleeping in the field")
(Greek: a suffix meaning: to talk, to speak; a branch of knowledge; any science or academic field that ends in -ology which is a variant of -logy; a person who speaks in a certain manner; someone who deals with certain topics or subjects)
(Greek: said to be a stem for "all, every, whole", or "complete"; that is, a field of study in biology that refers to the whole set of omics including their -omics and -ome subfields in order to understand life as a holistic existence and organic beings as a whole)
(a field in which scientists try to prolong the lives of people so they will have time to pay for the gadgets that are invented for them)
(a field of endeavor where many contribute but few are chosen)
(funding is invigorating a field which challenges some traditional aspects of science)
(a sub-field of tribology involving contact geometries)
Word Entries containing the term: “field
absorption field
A system of trenches filled with coarse aggregate surrounding distribution pipes; used to seep septic tank effluent into the surrounding soil.
This entry is located in the following unit: sorb-, sorpt- + (page 2)
atmospheric electric field (s) (noun), atmospheric electric fields (pl)
1. The atmosphere's electric field strength in volts per meter at any specified point in time and space; near the earth's surface, in fair-weather areas.

A typical datum is about 100 and the field is directed vertically in such a way as to drive positive charges downward.

2. A quantitative term indicating the electric field strength of the atmosphere at any specified point in space and time.
3. A measure, in volts per meter, of the electrical energy in a given portion of the earth's atmosphere at a given time.
This entry is located in the following units: atmo-, atm- + (page 3) electro-, electr-, electri- (page 1) sphero-, spher-, -sphere- (page 3)
biochemical field
A reference to the career field of science that deals with the chemical substances that occur in living organisms, the processes by which these substances enter in living organisms, the processes by which these substances enter into or are formed in the organisms and react with each other and the environment, and the methods by which the substances and processes are identified, characterized, and measured.
Coulomb field
1. The electric field generated by a stationary-charged particle.
2. The electrostatic field around a charged particle or object.
This entry is located in the following unit: coulomb + (page 1)
data field (s) (noun), data fields (pl)
An area of memory on an RFID (Radio-frequency identification) microchip that is assigned to a particular type of information: Data fields may be protected or they may be written over, so a data field might contain information about where an item should be sent.
data field protection (s) (noun), data field protections (pl)
The ability to prevent data stored in a specific area of memory of an RFID (Radio-frequency identification) microchip from being overwritten: Some companies use the data field protection device to store an Electronic Product Code, which doesn't change during the life of the product it's associated with.

electric field
1. A region in space in which lines of force produced by an electric charge exert a force on other electric charges.
2. A region in space in which a stationary electric charge experiences a force due to its charge.
3. The area around an electrically charged body in which other charged bodies are acted on by an attracting or repelling force.
4. The lines of force exerted on charged ions in the bodily tissues by the electrodes that cause charged particles to move from one pole to another pole.
5. One of the fundamental fields in nature, causing a charged body to be attracted to or repelled by other charged bodies.

Associated with an electromagnetic wave or a changing magnetic field.

The electric field is stronger where the field lines are close together than where they are farther apart.

The value of the electric field has dimensions of force per unit charge and is measured in units of newtons per coulomb.

This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 9)
electric field effect, Stark effect
1. The effect on spectrum lines of an electric field which is either externally applied or is an internal field caused by the presence of neighboring ions or atoms in a gas, liquid, or solid.
2. The effect of an electric field on spectrum lines.

The electric field may be externally applied; but in many cases it is an internal field caused by the presence of neighboring ions or atoms in a gas, liquid, or solid.

This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 9)
electric intensity, electric field intensity, electric field strength
The magnitude of an electric field at a point in the field that is equal to the force that would be exerted on a small unit charge placed at that point.

The electric field is the set of all values of the electric field strength, but electric field and electric field intensity (as well as electric field strength and electric vector) are used more or less interchangeably.

The trend is to use an electric field both for the field taken as a whole and for its value at any point with a context being sufficient to determine the precise meaning.

This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 10)
electric multipole field
1. The electromagnetic field produced by static or oscillating electric multipoles.
2. The electric and magnetic fields generated by a static or oscillating electric multipole.
This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 11)
electric vector, electric-field vector, electric-field intensity; electric-field strength
1. A vector which represents the force per unit charge acting on a positive charge in an electric field.
2. The force on a stationary positive electrical charge per unit charge at a point in an electric field.

It is usually measured in volts per meter.

This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 15)
electrolytic model, gelatin model, oil-field model, potentiometric model
1. A laboratory-model simulation of steady-state fluid flow through porous media found in a reservoir.
2. A laboratory simulation of steady-state fluid flow through porous reservoir media.

It depends on the mobility of ions in absorbent media (gelatin or blotter), or through a liquid (potentiometric technique which is a device used to make a precise determination of the electromotive force, or maximum output voltage, of a cell or generator by comparing it with a known voltage).

This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 36)
electromagnetic field tensor
An antisymmetric second-rank tensor whose elements are proportional to the electric and magnetic fields.
This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 39)
electromagnetic field, EMF; electric-magnetic field
1. All forms of energy emanating from an electrical source and transmitted through the air.

Included are the fields produced by light, radio, X-rays, and gamma rays and the higher the frequency of the fields produced, the more energy is contained.

2. The combination of electric and magnetic fields that surround moving electrical charges (for example, electrons); such as, those in electric currents.

Electromagnetic fields apply a force on other charges and can induce current flows in nearby conductors.

3. An oscillating electric field and its associated magnetic field acting at right angles to each other and at right angles to their direction of motion.
4. The region surrounding a moving electric charge which consists of magnetic and electric force fields especially related; such as, to orientation and strength, and that possesses a definite amount of energy.
5. A field created by the interplay of an electric field and a magnetic field when an electric current passes through a wire.

An electromagnetic field consists of two kinds of energy: electrostatic (potential energy) and electrodynamic (kinetic energy).

This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 39)
electrostatic field
1. An electric field that is associated with static (stationary, non-moving) electric charges.
2. An electric field with constant intensity; such as, that which is produced by stationary or static charges.
3. The region around an electrically charged subject which will induce an electrical charge on a second object, causing it to experience a force.

The voltage gradient or measure of the change of the physical quantity between two points at different potentials.

This entry is located in the following unit: electro-, electr-, electri- (page 83)
far-field communication
RFID reader antennas emit electromagnetic radiation (radio waves).

If an RFID tag is outside of one full wavelength of the reader, it is said to be in the "far field." If it is within one full wavelength away, it is said to be in the "near field."

The far field signal decays as the square of the distance from the antenna, while the near field signal decays as the cube of distance from the antenna.

So passive RFID systems that rely on far field communications (typically UHF and microwave systems) have a longer read range than those that use near field communications (typically low- and high-frequency systems).

field geology
The preparation of geological maps that show the distribution of geologic units selected for representation on a map.

They include the plotting of the orientation of such structural features as faults, joints, cleavage, small folds, and the attitude of beds with respect to three-dimensional space.

A common objective is to interpret the structure at some depth below the surface of the earth.

It is possible to determine, with some degree of accuracy, the structure beneath the surface by using information available at the surface of the earth.

This entry is located in the following unit: geo-, ge- + (page 3)
field programming
1. Tags that use EEPROM, or non-volatile memory, can be programmed after it is shipped from the factory. That is, users can write data to the tag when it is placed on a product.
2. The programming of information into a tag after it has been shipped from the manufacturer, usually meaning that information specific to the application can be added by the using organization. The tag is "read only".
field-whore
A "very common whore".
This entry is located in the following unit: whore + (page 1)
geomagnetic field
The magnetic field observed in and around the earth.

The intensity of the magnetic field at the earth's surface is approximately 0.32 gauss at the equator and 0.62 gauss at the north pole.

A gauss equivalent to 1 maxwell per square centimeter and a maxwell is equivalent to the flux that produces one abvolt in a one-turn circuit when the flux is reduced to zero at a uniform rate in one second; while a flux is the electric or magnetic field lines of force that traverse a given cross-sectional area.

This entry is located in the following units: -etic, -etics (page 8) geo-, ge- + (page 13) magnet-, magneto- + (page 1)
geomagnetic reversal, geomagnetic field reversal
Alternation of the earth's magnetic polarity or a reversal of the polarity of the earth's magnetic field which has occurred in the past as shown by the remanent magnetization found in igneous and sedimentary rocks.

The earth's internal magnetic field reverses, on average, about every 300,000 to 1 million years.

This reversal is very sudden on a geologic time scale, apparently taking about 5,000 years.

The time between reversals is highly variable, sometimes less than 40,000 years and at other times as long as 35 million years and no regularities or period times have been discovered so far.

A long interval of one polarity may be followed by a short interval of an opposite polarity.

This entry is located in the following unit: geo-, ge- + (page 14)
ion microscope, field-ion microscope
A microscope in which atoms are ionized by an electric field near a sharp tip.

The field then forces the ions to a fluorescent screen, which shows an enlarged image of the tip, and individual atoms are made visible.

This entry is located in the following unit: ion, ion- + (page 3)
ion-selective field-effect transistor, ISFET
A field-effect transistor whose gate electrode is sensitive to certain ions in an electrolyte, so that the gain of the transistor depends on the concentration of these ions.
This entry is located in the following units: ion, ion- + (page 9) trans-, tran-, tra- (page 4)
magnetic field, magnetic force
A vector field (a quantity that has both direction and magnitude, e.g. force or velocity, usually represented by an arrow) occupying physical space in which a magnetic force can be detected, typically in the presence of a permanent magnet, current-carrying conductor, or electromagnetic wave.
This entry is located in the following unit: magnet-, magneto- + (page 2)
near-field communication
RFID reader antennas emit electromagnetic radiation (radio waves).

If an RFID tag is within full wavelength of the reader, it is said to be in the "near field."

If it is more than the distance of one full wavelength away, it is said to be in the "far field."

The near field signal decays as the cube of distance from the antenna, while the far field signal decays as the square of the distance from the antenna.

So passive RFID systems that rely on near-field communication (typically low- and high-frequency systems) have a shorter read range than those that use far field communication (UHF and microwave systems).

This entry is located in the following unit: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID): Definitions (page 6)
reader field
The area of coverage.

Tags outside the reader field do not receive radio waves and can't be read.

This entry is located in the following unit: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID): Definitions (page 8)
thermal field size
An area over which therapeutic heating is most likely to be produced.
unified field theory
1. Any theory that combines two or more field theories; such as, Maxwell's unification of the field theories of electricity and magnetism by developing the theory of electromagnetism.
2. Specifically, the effort by Einstein and others to unify gravitational force and electromagnetic force with a single set of laws and, more generally, to provide a geometrical interpretation for all physical interactions.
This entry is located in the following unit: uni-, un- (page 4)