You searched for: “days
days, daze
days (DAYZ) (noun)
The periods of light between sunrises and sunsets: For some reason, summer days are more desired than winter days.
daze (DAYZ) (noun)
A stunned or bewildered condition: Percy left the science class in a daze more than he had anticipated.

For some people, too often school days result in school daze.

(a compilation of several languages)
(bad days)
Word Entries containing the term: “days
Albanian (Shqip) days
e hënë [mandi] (Monday)
e martë [tjuuzdi] (Tuesday)
e mërkurë [wenzdi] (Wednesday)
e enjte [thëërzdi] (Thursday)
e premte [frajdi] (Friday)
e shtunë [sŠtërdi] (Saturday)
e dielë (djelë) [sandi] (Sunday)

Hënë, or Hanë(e) is vernacular for “moon.”

Martë and Mërkure refer to Mars and Mercury, respectively.

Enjte is thought to have come from a local deity identified with Zeus.

Premte may mean "evening". If so, it may either mean: (1) "eve" or "vigil" and is equivalent to the church term "preparation" or (2) it is another name for "Venus", "Hesperus", or "evening star".

Since the other names are not church terms, #2 is most likely the meaning (according to F.H. Colson).

Dielë, or Dielli, is believed to be the vernacular for "sun".

—From The Week,
an Essay on the "Origin and Development of the Seven-Day Cycle"
by Francis H. Colso; Cambridge University Press;
Cambridge, England; 1926; pages 119-120.
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 1)
Anglo-Saxon days
sunnandaeg, (Sunday)
monandaeg (Monday)
Tiwesdaeg (Tuesday)
Wodensdaeg (Wednesday)
Thursdaeg (Thursday)
Frigedaeg (Friday)
Saterndaeg (Saturday)

For some Old Scandinavians, the name for Saturday was Loverdag, "bath-night" or "washing-day" because the Danes were noted for their cleanliness, according to an old chronicler.

—From Clockwork Man by Lawrence Wright,
Elek Books Ltd.; London; 1968; page 43.
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 1)
Arabic days
as sabt (Saturday)
al aHad (Sunday)
al eathayn (Monday)
athalathe (Tuesday)
al arbe'a' (Wednesday)
al khamis (Thursday)
al jum'a (Friday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 1)
Armenian days
y-ergushapt'i, yerkushaphti'; erkushabt'i (Monday)
y-erekshapti, yerekshabthi'; erek'shab'ti (Tuesday)
chorek-shapti, chorekshaphthi'; ch'orek'shabt'i (Wednesday)
hinqshapti, hingshapthi; hingshabt'i (Thursday)
urpha'th; urbat' (Friday)
shapha'th; shabat' (Saturday)
ckiracki'; kiraki (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 1)
Azerbaijani days
bazar günü (Sunday)
bazar ertuhsi (Monday)
çuhrsuhnbuh axsaml (Tuesday)
çuhrsuhnbuh günü (Wednesday)
cümuh axsaml (Thursday)
cümuh günü (Friday)
suhnbuh (Saturday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 1)
Bantu-Botatwe dialect days
in-sondo, in sunda, n-sondo (Sunday)
my-sumbuluko, mu-simbuluko (Monday)
bwa bili, u bwa bili, bu ti bili (Tuesday)
bwa tatu, u bwa tatu, bu ti tatu (Wednesday)
bwa ne, buti banda (Thursday)
bwa sanu, u bwa sanu, bu ti musanu (Friday)
mu-jibelo, bu-tabula kamwi (Saturday)

Bantu-Botatwe dialect is thought to be the "most archaic of the Bantu languages".

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 1)
Basque (Euskara, Euskera, Eskuara, or Eskwara) days
astelehena (Monday)
asteatea, astearte (Tuesday)
asteazkena, asteazken (Wednesday)
osteguna (orzeguna), ostegun (Thursday)
ostirala (ortzirala), ostiral; barikua (Friday)
larunbata, larunbat, larunbateko, or zapatua (Saturday)
igandea, igande, igadeko or domeka, dominical (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 2)
Bengali days
soom bar (Monday)
mangal bar (Tuesday)
budh bar (Wednesday)
briwaspati bar (Thursday)
sukra bar (Friday)
sani bar (Saturday)
rabi bar (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 2)
Bohemian days
sandej (Sunday)
mandej (Monday)
tyuzdej (Tuesday)
wenzdeg (Wednesday)
thorzdej (Thursday)
frajdej (Friday)
saetrdej (Saturday)

Bretonian days
al Lun (al loar) [moon] (Monday)
ar Meurzh [Mars] (Tuesday)
ar Mer'her [Mercury] (Wednesday)
ar Yaou [Jupiter] (Thursday)
ar GWener [Venus] (Friday)
ar Sadorn [Saturn] (Saturday)
ar Sul (an heol) [sun] (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 2)
Bulgarian days
ponedélnik (Monday)
vtornik (Tuesday)
srjáda (Wednesday)
cetvartak (Thursday)
petak (Friday)
sabota (Saturday)
nedalja (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following units: -arian (page 2) Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 2)
Catalonian (Català) days
diumenge (Sunday)
dilluns (Monday)
dimarts (Tuesday)
dimecres (Wednesday)
dijous (Thursday)
divendres (Friday)
dissabte (Saturday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 2)
Congolese (former French colony) days
mokolo ya libosó [1st day] (Monday)
mokolo ya míbalé [2nd day] (Tuesday)
mokolo ya mísáto [3rd day] (Wednesday)
mokolo ya mínei [4th day] (Thursday)
mokolo ya mitáno [5th day] (Friday)
póso [week] (Saturday)
eyenga, lomíngo (Sunday/Feastday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 2)
Croatian (Hrvatski) days
ponedjeljak (Monday)
utorak (Tuesday)
srijeda (Wednesday)
c'etvrtak (Thursday)
petak (Friday)
subota (Saturday)
nedjelja (Sunday)

Monday, or ponedjeljak, means the “first day after no activities” or the “first day after doing nothing [non-working day].”
Tuesday, or utorak, means the “second day after no activities [non-working day].”
Wednesday, or srijeda, means “middle” of the week.
Thursday, or cetvrtak, means “fourth working day” after the non-working day.
Friday, or petak, means “fifth working day” after the non-working day.
Saturday, or subota, means “sabbath.”
Sunday, or nedjelja, means “no activities” or “doing nothing” [non-working day].



This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 2)
Czech (C"esky;) days
ponde'lí (Monday)
útery; (Tuesday)
str'eda (Wednesday)
c'tvrtek (Thursday)
pátek (Friday)
sobota (Saturday)
nede'le (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 3)
Danish (Dansk) days
mandag, Monday
tirsdag (Tuesday)
onsdag (Wednesday)
torsdag (Thursday)
fredag (Friday)
lørdag (Saturday)
søndag (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 3)
Dutch days
Maandag (Monday)
Dinsdag (Tuesday)
Woensdag (Wednesday)
Donderdag (Thursday)
Vrijdag (Friday)
Zaterdag (Saturday)
Zondag (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 3)
Egyptian days
yohm al-ahadd (Sunday)
yohm al-itnin (Monday)
yohm at-talat (Tuesday)
yohm al-arba‘a (Wednesday)
yohm al-khamis (Thursday)
yohm-al-gum’a (Friday)
yohm as-sabt (Saturday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 3)
English days of the week
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 3)
Esperanto days
lundo (Monday)
mardo (Tuesday)
merkredo (Wednesday)
àau"do (Thursday)
vendredo (Friday)
sabato (Saturday)
dimanc]o (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 3)
Estonian (Esti keel) days
esmaspäev (Monday)
teisipäev (Tuesday)
kolmapäev (Wednesday)
neljapäev (Thursday)
reede (Friday)
laupäev (Saturday)
pühapäev (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 3)
Ethiopian (Amharic) days
sänbät (Sunday)
sänno (Monday)
maksänno (Tuesday)
rob, räbu (Wednesday)
hamus, amus (Thursday)
arb (Friday)
sänbät, qadame (Saturday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 3)
Every calendar's days are numbered.
This entry is located in the following unit: paraprosdokian, paraprosdokia (page 3)
Finnish (Suomi) days
sunnuntai (Sunday)
maanantai (Monday)
tiistai (Tuesday)
keskiviikko (Wednesday)
torstai (Thursday)
perjantai (Friday)
lauantai (Saturday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 4)
French (Français) days
dimanche (Sunday)
lundi (Monday)
mardi (Tuesday)
mercredi (Wednesday)
jeudi (Thursday)
vendredi (Friday)
samedi (Saturday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 4)
Georgian days
orschabati (Monday)
ßamschabati (Tuesday)
otchschabati (Wednesday)
chutschabati (Thursday)
p’araßk’ewi (Friday)
schabati (Saturday)
k’wira (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 4)
German (Deutsch) days
Montag (Monday)
Dienstag (Tuesday)
Mittwoch (Wednesday)
Donnerstag (Thursday)

Freitag (Friday)
Samstag/Sonnabend (Saturday)
Sonntag (Sunday)

Dienstag does not necessarily mean, "day of service" as many Germans believe.

Originally, the "week" came from the Babylonians and then through the Jews to the Greeks and the Romans.

The days of the week were named after the gods of the seven ancient planets (thought to be the sun, moon, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, and Saturn). The Germanic people learned about the planets from the Romans in about the 4th century A.D. and replaced the names with those of their corresponding German (Teutonic) gods.

The name Dienstag spread from the Lower Rhine in their dialect as Dinges, Dinsdach, and from the Middle Netherlands as Dinxendach which apparently goes back to an inscription which is Roman-Frisian from the third century A.D. named for the god Mars, Thingsus, the Thing, "protector".

Originally from Old English ping, "condition, state, meeting, court of justice"; related to pingian, "to intercede, to plead, to arrange"; Old Saxon, Old Frisian, thing, Old Norse, ping, "assembly"; Middle Dutch, dinc; Dutch, ding; Old High German, thing, ding; Middle High German, dinc, "assembly"; German Ding, "thing".

All of these words stand for the Indo-European tenkos, from the base ten-, "to extend (in space or in time)", and originally denoted "meeting at a fixed time", whence developed the meanings "affairs, things, thing". Gothic Peihs, "time"; originally meant "assembly taking place at a fixed time".

The word is a copy of the Latin Martis dies. The Germanic god is the equivalent of "heaven’s god" (himmel’s gott).

In Old High German, it was Ziu; in Old English, it was Tiw; and in Old Icelandic, it was Tyr [the name is originally related to the Greek god, Zeus, who as the god of war was changed to the equivalent Roman god, Mars.

The name of this god was also maintained in other names of the week days. For example, Alemannisch was Zistig; Middle High German, Ziestac; Old High German, Ziostag; Old English Tiwesdaeg; and Old Icelandic, Tysdagr; then Swedish, Tisdag; and English, Tuesday.

Corresponding to these names is the Bavarian, Ertag or Erchtag (Dienstag) as a word from the Gothic mission borrowed from the Greek Areos Hemera (day of Ares, meaning Mars, and Ziu). The Bavarian and Alemanisch dialect words were superseded in the 17th century by Dienstag.


—Based on information from
Duden Etymologie, Herkunftswörterbuch der deutschen Sprache;
edited by Günther Drosdowski and Paul Grebe;
Bibliographisches Institut; Mannheim, Germany; 1963.

Noah Webster wrote that one of the meanings for Saxon thing is "a meeting, council or convention"; thingan, thingian, "to hold a meeting, to plead, to supplicate".

He goes on to say that German ding, "a thing, a court"; dingen, "to go to law, to hire or to haggle; Dingstag, Tuesday, "thing’s day"; beding, "condition, clause".

The primary sense of the root, which is tig or thig, is "to press, to urge, to drive or to strain", and hence, its application to "courts", or "suits at law"; "a seeking of right".

We observe that Dingsdag, Dingdag, in some of the dialects signifies "Tuesday", and this from the circumstance that that day of the week was, as it still is in some states, the day of opening courts; that is, litigation day, or suitors' day, a day of striving for justice; or perhaps "combatday", the day of trial by battle.

This leads to the unfolding of another fact. Among our ancestors, Tig or Tiig, was the name of the deity of combat and war, the Teutonic Mars; that is, strife, combat deified.

This word was contracted into tiw or tu, and hence Tiwesdæg or Tuesdæg, and then Tuesday, the day consecrated to Tiig, the god of war.

It seems this is merely the day of commencing court and trial; litigation day. This Tiig, the "god of war", is strife, and this leads us to the root of thing, which is "to drive, to urge, to strive".

From Noah Webster's definition of Tuesday, we find Tiwæsdæ or Tuesdæy comes from Tig, Tiig or Tuisco, the Mars of our ancestors the deity that presided over combats, strife and litigation. Hence Tuesday is court day, assize* day; the day for combat or commencing litigation.

*Assize (uh-SIGHZ) originally was an assembly of knights and other "substantial" men. It is now considered an enactment made by a legislative assembly.


—Based on information from:
An American Dictionary of the English Language by Noah Webster;
Johnson Reprint Corporation; New York & London; 1970.

Mittwoch

Apparently once the "fourth day" of the German week, Mittwoch, Middle High German Mit[te]woche, and before that it was Mitta-wewha in Late Old High German, which was the church (vulgar) Latin translation of "media Hebdomas".

Old High German Mittawewha has grown together from the adjective mitta (Old High German Mitti), meaning "located in the middle". The Roman Catholic Church tried to get rid of the memories of the pagan gods and goddesses by deleting formerly used Wuo-tanestag (Netherlands Woenstag; English Wednesday, and Swedish Onsdag) which were Wodansdag (Odinsdag) or tag, but now it simply means "middle-of-the-week" or Mittwoch.


—Based on information from:
Duden Etymologie, Herkunftswörterbuch der deutschen Sprache;
edited by Günther Drosdowski and Paul Grebe;
Bibliographisches Institut; Mannheim, Germany; 1963.

Sonnabend

"Saturday" may either be Samstag or (in some instances) Sonnabend, which means "evening before sun(day)".

Based on an Old English (Anglo-Saxon) formation, brought to Europe from England by St. Boniface (Wynfrid or Wynfrith), ca. 675-754 A.D.; during his Christian-missionary efforts to Germany.

Old English sunnan-aefen first meant the evening before Sunday, then it became sonnanaband in Old High German, and later in Middle High German sun(nen) abent. This word later referred to the whole day, not just the evening.


—Based on information from:
Duden Etymologie, Herkunftswörterbuch der deutschen Sprache;
edited by Günther Drosdowski and Paul Grebe; Bibliographisches Institut;
Mannheim, Germany; 1963.


This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 4)
Greek (Ellinikí or Eliniké ) days
Kuriakí (Sunday)
Deutéra [second day] (Monday)
Tríti [third day] (Tuesday)
Tetárti [fourth day] (Wednesday)
Pémpti [fifth day] (Thursday)
Paraskeuí [sixth day] (Friday)
Sábbato or Sabbáto (?) (Saturday)

Kuriakí means, "Lord’s day" which is followed by "second, third, fourth, fifth" days. Paraskeuí, meaning, "preparation", is a biblical term used historically by Greek-church fathers. Sábbato or Sabbáto means the Sabbath, or "to rest" as in "day of rest".


—Based on information from
The Week, an Essay on the Origin & Development of the Seven-Day Cycle
by Francis H. Colson; Cambridge University Press;
Cambridge, England; 1926; pages 119-120.
The The Greek alphabet is available on this page.
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 4)
Hawaiian days


Reflecting the days in a month or the “moon’s age.”

1. Hilo
2. Hoaka
3. Ku kahi
4. Ku lua
5. Ku kolu
6. Ku pau
7. Ole ku kahi
8. Ole ku lua
9. Ole ku kolu
10. Ole ku pau
11. Huna
12. Mohalu
13. Hua
14. Akua
15. Hoko
16. Mahealani
17. Kulu
18. Laau ku kahi
19. Laau ku lua
20. Laau pau
21. Ole ku kahi
22. Ole ku lua
23. Ole pau
24. Kaloa ku kahi
25. Kaloa ku lua
26. Kaloa pau
27. Kane
28. Lono
29. Mauli
30. Muku
—Based on information from
The Maori-Polynesian Comparative Dictionary by Edward Tregear;
Anthropological Publications; Oosterhout, The Netherlands; 1969.
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 4)
Hebrew days

yom rishon (yohm ree-sholm) (Sunday)
yom sheni (ahd yohm shay-nee) (Monday)
yom shelishi (yohm shlee-shee) (Tuesday)
yom revi’i (yohm reh-vee-ee) (Wednesday)
yom hamishi (yohm khah-mee-shee) (Thursday)
yom shishi (yohm shee-shee) (Friday)
yom *** (yohm shah-baht) (Saturday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 4)
Hindi days; Vikramaditya and (Christian) days
somva\r (Monday)
mang’l, ma{ngava\r (Tuesday)
budhva\r (Wednesday)
guruva\r, br≥haspativa\r (Thursday)
s;ukrava\r, shukravar (Friday)
s;aniva\r, shanivar (Saturday)
itva\r, itvahr, raviva\r (Sunday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 4)
Hungarian (Magyar) days
hétfo= (Monday)
kedd (Tuesday)
szerda (Wednesday)
csütörtök (Thursday)
péntek (Friday)
szombat (Saturday)
vasánap (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following units: -arian (page 3) Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 5)
Iranian (Farsi) days
Sham-beh (Saturday)
Yek-sham-beh, “first day after Saturday.” (Sunday)
Do-sham-beh, “second day after Saturday.” (Monday)
Ce-sham-beh, “third day after Saturday.” (Tuesday)
Tschâhâr-sham-beh, “fourth day after Saturday.” (Wednesday)
Pandj-sham-beh, “fifth day after Saturday.” (Thursday)
Djom’e (Friday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 5)
Irish-Gaelic (Goidelic) days
Dé Luain (Monday)
Dé Máirt (Tuesday)
Dé Céadaoin (Wednesday)
Déardaoin (Thursday)
Dé hAoine (Friday)
Dé Sathairn (Saturday)
Dé Domhnaigh (Sunday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 5)
Italian (Italiano) days
lunedì (Monday)
martedì (Tuesday)
mercoledì (Wednesday)
giovedì (Thursday)
venerdì (Friday)
sabato (Saturday)
domenica (Sunday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 5)
Korean days
il yo (Sunday)
il whal yo (Monday)
il wha yo (Tuesday)
il soo yo (Wednesday)
il mok yo (Thursday)
il khym yo (Friday)
il toh yo (Saturday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 5)
Kurdish days
yeksem (Sunday)
dusçem (Monday)
tûzdêy, sêsçemî, se]sçem (Tuesday)
wênsdêy, çarsçem (Wednesday)
surzdêy, pêncsçemb, pe]ncsçem (Thursday)
fraydêy, ı]n, ı]nı] (Friday)
cuma, înî, sçemı] (Saturday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 5)
Latin days
dies solis (dies dominica, eccl.) (Sunday)
dies lunae (Monday)
dies Martis (Tuesday)
dies Mercurii (Wednesday)
dies Jovis (Thursday)
dies Veneris (Friday)
dies Saturni (Saturday)
Latin calendar.
Word Info image © ALL rights are reserved.
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 5)
Latvian (Lettish, Latviska) days
pirmdiena (Monday)
otrdiena (Tuesday)
tresdiena (Wednesday)
ceturtdiena (Thursday)
piektdiena (Friday)
sestdiena (Saturday)
svetdiena (Sunday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 6)
Lithuanian (Lietuvis'kai) days
pirmadienis (Monday)
antradienis (Tuesday)
treciadienis (Wednesday)
ketvirtadienis (Thursday)
penktadienis (Friday)
sestadienis (Saturday)
sekmadienis (Sunday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 6)
Macedonian (modern) days
ponedelnik (Monday)
vtornik (Tuesday)
sreda (Wednesday)
cetvrtok (Thursday)
petok (Friday)
sabota (Saturday)
nedela (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 6)
Mandarin (Chinese) days
xingqiyi [sheeng-chee-ee] 1st day (Monday)
xingqier [sheeng-chee-urr] 2nd day (Tuesday)
xingqisan [sheeng-chee-sahn] 3rd day (Wednesday)
xingqisi [sheeng-chee-suh] 4th day (Thursday)
xingqiwu [sheeng-chee-wuu] 5th day (Friday)
xingqiliu [sheeng-chee-leo] 6th day (Saturday)
xingqitian [sheeng-chee-tee-in] 7th day (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 6)
Norwegian (Norsk) days
søndag (Sunday)
mandag (Monday)
tirsdag (Tuesday)
onsdag (Wednesday)
torsdag (Thursday)
fredag (Friday)
lørdag (Saturday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 6)
Philippines (Tagalog) days
Lúnes (Monday)
Martés (Tuesday)
Miyérkoles (Wednesday)
Huwébes (Thursday)
Biyérnes (Friday)
Sábado (Saturday)
Linggó (Sunday)

This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 6)
Polish (Polski) days
poniedzialek (Monday)
wtorek (Tuesday)
sroda (Wednesday)
czwartek (Thursday)
piatek (Friday)
sobota (Saturday)
niedziela (Sunday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 6)
Portuguese (Português) days
domingo (Sunday)
segunda feira (Monday)
terça feira (Tuesday)
quarta feira (Wednesday)
quinta feira (Thursday)
sexta feira (Friday)
sábado (Saturday)

Portugal dropped the five planetary names for the days of the week and replaced them with numerical references because it adopted the regular ecclesiastical (Roman-Catholic) system which was once numerical in an effort to eliminate the use of the names of the "pagan" gods and goddesses.


This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 7)
Romanian (Româna) days
luni (Monday)
marti (Tuesday)
miercuri (Wednesday)
joi (Thursday)
vineri (Friday)
sîmbata (Saturday)
duminica (Sunday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 7)
Russian (Russki) days
ponedél’nik(panidy él ‘nik)(Monday)
vtórnik(ftórnik)(Tuesday)
sredá(sryedá)(Wednesday)
cetvérg(chitvérk)(Thursday)
pjátnica(pyátnitsa)(Friday)
subbóta(subóta)(Saturday)
voskresén’e(vaskrisyen’ye)(Sunday)

voskresén’e, “resurrection” day. Nedél-ya, "not working" is used in some Russian dialects.

ponedél’nik, po means "after", so "Mon-day" is expressed as the "day after the non-working day".

vtórnik, "second working day after the non-working day".

sredá, "middle" of the week.

cetvérg, "fourth working day after the non-working day".

pjátnica, "fifth working day after the non-working day".

subbóta, "Sabbath" day.


The fact that Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday are spoken of as the second, fourth, and fifth days instead of third, fifth and sixth, shows that the week is thought of as beginning on Monday. This is a natural idea from the point of view of workers.

This interpretation is opposed to ecclesiastical and biblical usage. It is thus in marked contrast with the strong religious feeling expressed in the ordinary Russian name of “Resurrection” day for Sunday.



This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 7)
Spanish (Castilian) days
domingo (Sunday)
lunes (Monday)
martes (Tuesday)
miércoles (Wednesday)
jueves (Thursday)
viernes (Friday)
sábado (Saturday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 7)
Swahili days
juma mosi, 1st day (Saturday)
juma pili, 2nd day (Sunday)
juma tatu, 3rd day (Monday)
juma nne, 4th day (Tuesday)
juma tano, 5th day (Wednesday)
alhamisi, 6th day (Thursday)
ijumaa, 7th day (Friday)

—Based on information from
Berlitz World-Wide Phrase Book edited by staff of
The Berlitz Schools of Languages;
Published by Grosset & “Dunlap; New York; 1962.
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 7)
Swedish (Svenska) days
söndag (Sunday)
måndag (Monday)
tisdag (Tuesday)
onsdag (Wednesday)
torsdag (Thursday)
fredag (Friday)
lordag (Saturday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 7)
Thai (Siamese) days
wahn jahn (Monday)
wahn ahng-kahn (Tuesday)
wahn hpoot (Wednesday)
wahn hpa-hreu-haht (Thursday)
wahn lsook (Friday)
wahn rsow (Saturday)
wahn ah-htit (Sunday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 7)
Tibetan days
sadawa (Monday)
samimaa (Tuesday)
salhagpa, Wednesday sap’uubu (Thursday)
sapassang (Friday)
sapenpa (Saturday)
sanjima (Sunday)
This entry is located in the following unit: Calendar Names of Days and Months in Different Languages (page 8)
Word Entries at Get Words containing the term: “days
days of storage
The number of consecutive days the stand-alone system will meet a defined load without solar energy input.

This term is related to system availability.

This entry is located in the following unit: Photovoltaic Conversion Efficiency Terms + (page 5)